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  • Author or Editor: Phyllis R. Gilreath x
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Abstract

Budbreak of ‘Woodard’ and ‘Bluegem’ rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) occurred sooner than ‘Tifblue’ following chilling at constant 10 and 15°C and a diurnal regime of 8 hours at 15°/16 hours at 7°. Results indicate a narrower range of effective chilling temperatures for ‘Tifblue’. The temperature effect was more pronounced for ‘Woodard’ rooted cuttings than budsticks and was more significant for floral than vegetative budbreak. Floral budbreak of rooted cuttings subjected to 14 days at 30° in the middle of the chilling period was faster than at continuous chilling treatments. The number of days required for budbreak was significantly reduced as chilling hours increased.

Open Access

Abstract

Evaporative cooling by overhead sprinkling during rest advanced bloom of ‘Sungold’ nectarine [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] about 11 days. The bloom advance was due to water applied to the canopy and not to increased water in the root zone. A rest prediction model for low chilling nectarines which accurately predicted rest completion for all unsprinkled treatments failed to predict the date of rest termination for sprinkled treatments, suggesting other factors are involved in addition to temperature.

Open Access

Abstract

Floral bud break of 1-year-old rooted cuttings of ‘Sungold’ nectarine (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was observed following chilling at constant and diurnal temperature regimes. Continuous exposure to 10°C was as effective as 7°. Rate of bud break increased as chilling increased up to 750 hours. Floral bud break of plants exposed to 14 days at 30° during the middle of the chilling period was more rapid but failed to reach the level of activity of plants exposed to constant temperatures. A chill unit model developed for ‘Sungold’ nectarine which has a chilling requirement of 550 hours indicated a broader range of effective temperatures and a higher optimum for rest completion as compared to the Utah model and predicted rest completion more accurately than other methods when applied to orchard temperature data.

Open Access

`Jupiter' and `Verdel' bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) transplants set to the depth of cotyledon leaves or to the first true leaf yielded more fruit than transplants set to the top of the rootball. Increased yields and early stand establishment criteria (number of leaves, leaf area, plant weight, and plant height) suggest that planting pepper transplants deeper than is now common is commercially beneficial in Florida. Deeper plantings may place pepper roots in a cooler environment and reduce fluctuations in soil temperature. Moderated soil temperature, in conjunction with earlier fertilizer and water acquisition, may give deeper-planted pepper plants a competitive edge in growth.

Free access

`Agriset', `All Star', and `Colonial' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) transplants set to a depth of the first true leaf and `Cobia' transplants set to a depth of the cotyledon leaves yielded more fruit at first harvest than plants set to the top of the rootball (root–shoot interface). The increase in fruit count was predominantly in the extra-large category. More red fruit at first harvest suggested that deeper planting hastens tomato maturity. The impact of planting depth diminished with successive harvests, indicating the response to be primarily a first-harvest phenomenon in tomato.

Free access