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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Theodore A. Mackey, Patrick A. Jones, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

‘Echo’ (PI 682654, CVAC 2262) is a new ornamental blueberry (Vaccinium hybrid) that is targeted toward the home gardener and ornamental landscape trade. It is from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, and was released in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Echo’ is the second strongly repeat fruiting (remontant, off-season, perpetual flowering) blueberry developed from a northern-adapted germplasm; its parent ‘Perpetua’ (U.S. Plant Patent 24,209) was the first (Finn et al., et al., 2015). When grown in Oregon, this hybrid flowers in April, along with other

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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Mary E. Peterson, Brian M. Yorgey, Patrick P. Moore, Patrick A. Jones, Jungmin Lee, and Robert R. Martin

‘Kokanee’ (Fig. 1) is a new primocane-fruiting red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA–ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR released in cooperation with the Oregon State Agricultural Experiment Station. ʻKokaneeʼ is a high-yielding cultivar that produces large, firm fruit that are bright-red-colored and have very good, sweet flavor. The cultivar should be widely adapted to wherever primocane-fruiting raspberries are grown and has looked promising in trials as a wholesale, fresh market berry produced in tunnels in northern hemisphere, off season market regions (e.g., Mexico, Spain). An application for a

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Patrick A. Jones, James T. Brosnan, Gregory K. Breeden, José J. Vargas, Brandon J. Horvath, and John C. Sorochan

Divoting is a common occurrence on golf courses and athletic fields. Research was conducted at the University of Tennessee Center for Athletic Field Safety (Knoxville, TN) during 2012–13 evaluating the effects of preemergence (PRE) herbicide applications on hybrid bermudagrass [C. dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy, cv. Tifway] divot resistance and recovery. Plots were subjected to the factorial combination of seven herbicide treatments (indaziflam at 35 and 52.5 g·ha−1; prodiamine at 840 g·ha−1; pendimethalin at 3360 g·ha−1; dithiopyr at 560 g·ha−1; oxadiazon at 3360 g·ha−1; non-treated control) and three divot timings [1, 2, and 3 months after herbicide treatment (MAT)]. Rates were based on label recommendations for preemergence crabgrass (Digitaria spp.) control. Herbicides were applied on 15 Mar. 2012 and 2013. Divots were generated using a weighted pendulum apparatus designed to impart 531 J of impact energy to the turf sward with a golf club. Divot resistance was quantified by measuring divot volume at each timing while divot recovery was quantified by measuring turf cover in the divot scar using digital image analysis. All herbicide-treated plots produced divots with volumes ≤ the non-treated control. In 2013, volumes were greater for divots produced 1 MAT (215 cm3) than those created 2 MAT (191 cm3) or 3 MAT (157 cm3). No differences in divot recovery were detected as a result of herbicide treatment in either year. Under the conditions of this study, applications of PRE herbicides at labeled rates did not affect divot resistance or recovery.

Chemical names: N-[(1R,2S)-2,3-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-1H-inden-1-yl]-6-(1-fluoroethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (indaziflam), 2,4 dinitro-N3,N3-dipropyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3-benzenediamine (prodiamine), N-(1-ethylpropyl)-3,4-dimethyl-2,6-dinitrobenzenamine (pendimethalin), S,S-dimethyl 2-(difluoromethyl)-4-(2-methylpropyl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)-3,5-pyridinedicarbothioate (dithiopyr), 3-[2,4-dichloro-5-(1-methylethoxy)phenyl]-5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-(3H)-one (oxadiazon)

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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, and Robert R. Martin

‘Columbia Sunrise’ is a new, very early ripening, thornless trailing blackberry (Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) cultivar from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Columbia Sunrise’ is introduced as a very early ripening, thornless trailing blackberry with large, firm fruit with a very good flavor and good yields that will be suited for hand-harvested fresh and machine-harvested processed markets. ‘Columbia Sunrise’ should be adapted to areas where other trailing blackberries can be grown successfully. A U.S. Plant Patent has been

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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Jungmin Lee, and Robert R. Martin

‘Columbia Giant’ is a new thornless trailing blackberry (Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) cultivar with very large fruit from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Columbia Giant’ is introduced as a high quality, high yielding, thornless trailing blackberry with good flavor and firm fruit that are suited for local fresh market sales but can be machine harvested for the processing market with very good frozen quality. ‘Columbia Giant’ should be adapted to areas where other trailing blackberries can be grown

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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Theodore A. Mackey, Patrick P. Moore, Michael Dossett, Patrick A. Jones, Jungmin Lee, Robert R. Martin, Kelly L. Ivors, and Andrew R. Jamieson

‘Marys Peak’ is a new June-bearing (short-day) strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier) cultivar from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station. The most outstanding characteristic of ‘Marys Peak’ is its excellent fruit quality as a processed or fresh product. Its flavor, size, firmness, color, low incidence of botrytis fruit rot (Botrytis cinerea Pers.), and yield are particularly notable. A U.S. plant patent application (S.N. 15/330,507) has been submitted.

Origin

‘Marys Peak’ was selected in 2002 from the cross

Open access

Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

‘Twilight’ is a thornless, semi-erect, high-quality blackberry (Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) that has very firm, large, dark, and sweet fruit suited for the fresh market; it ripens in the early midseason for a semi-erect type of blackberry. ‘Twilight’ was released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA–ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. This cultivar is an offspring of blackberries similar in pedigree to Eclipse and Galaxy, that combine germplasm from the eastern and western North American blackberry germplasm pools (Finn et al., 2020a,

Open access

Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Gil Buller, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

‘Galaxy’ is a thornless, semierect high-quality blackberry (Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) that has firm, large, dark fruit suited for the fresh market and that ripen in the early season for this type of blackberry. ‘Galaxy’ was released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. This cultivar is unique in that we believe it and ‘Eclipse’ (Finn et al., 2020) are the first cultivars to combine germplasm from the eastern and western North American blackberry germplasm pools. ‘Galaxy’ is

Open access

Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Gil Buller, Sedat Serçe, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

‘Eclipse’ is a thornless, semierect, high quality blackberry (Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) that has firm, uniformly shaped, dark fruit suited for the fresh market and that ripen in the early season for this type of blackberry. ‘Eclipse’ was released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Eclipse’ is introduced as a high quality blackberry that has medium-sized, uniformly shaped berries that ripen in the early, semierect blackberry season where it is firmer or earlier than current standards. ‘Eclipse’ and ‘Galaxy’,

Free access

Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

‘Hall’s Beauty’ is a new, early-ripening, high-quality, firm, and sweet thornless trailing blackberry (Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) cultivar with extremely large and attractive double flowers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. Mr. Harvey Hall (Shekinah Berries Ltd., Pyes Pa, New Zealand), with New Zealand HortResearch, the forerunner of The New Zealand Institute Plant & Food Research, originally incorporated the source of thornlessness used in ‘Hall’s Beauty’ into useful germplasm. The collaborative effort between him and USDA-ARS breeders