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  • Author or Editor: P.M. McCool x
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Abstract

‘Troyer’ citrange [Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. × Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] seedlings were exposed to 82 ppm HCl for 20 minutes or 100 pphm ozone for 4 hours at 5, 12, and 16 weeks after inoculation with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus fasciculatus (Thaxter) Gerd. & Trappe. One group of citrange seedlings was exposed in a 2nd experiment to ozone at 90 pphm for 6 hours, once weekly, and a second group was exposed to 45 pphm for 3 hours, twice weekly for a period of 19 weeks beginning 1 week after fungal inoculation. Intermittent HCl and ozone exposures significantly reduced height and dry weight of mycorrhizal, but not of non-mycorrhizal plants. Fungal chlamydospore production was reduced 57% in ozone treatments but was not reduced by HCl exposures. Weekly exposures to 90 pphm ozone levels significantly reduced total dry weight in mycorrhizal plants by 42%, but reduced that of non-mycorrhizal plants by only 19%. However, 45 pphm ozone levels did not cause a similar reduction in either mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal infection was reduced 15% and spore production 39% at 90 pphm ozone. The lower ozone level (45 pphm) reduced infection 22%, but had no effect on spore production. Absorption of phosphorus was not reduced by ozone treatments in either mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal plants.

Open Access

Abstract

Tomato seedlings (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. ‘Heinz 1350’) were inoculated with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus fasciculatus (Thaxter) Gerd. & Trappe and either exposed to 30 pphm (589 μg/m3) ozone or to filtered air for 3 hours once weekly, beginning 3 weeks after inoculation, under long photoperiods (12–13.5 hr). Root infection by G. fasciculatus in ozone-exposed plants was retarded from week 3 to 5 compared to controls but recovered by week 7. Growth rates of mycorrhizal control plants were significantly greater than ozone-exposed mycorrhizal plants, but there were no differences in growth rates of nonmycorrhizal controls, mycorrhizal ozone-exposed plants, and nonmycorrhizal ozone-exposed plants. Under short photoperiods (less than 12 hr), growth rates of mycorrhizal controls were less than nonmycorrhizal controls and ozone did not significantly affect growth rates of nonmycorrhizal plants relative to controls. Leaf chlorophyll levels were similar whether plants were mycorrhizal, nonmycorrhizal, or exposed to ozone.

Open Access

Abstract

Response of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. California Dark Red Kidney to 2 different ozone concentration distributions was examined at 2 dose levels in controlled fumigations. When peak ozone concentrations were equal and total doses equivalent, there was no difference in injury, growth, or yield between a simulated ambient distribution with normal diurnal ozone fluctuations and a uniform distribution typical of laboratory fumigation at constant concentration. Plants fumigated with either ambient or uniform ozone distribution had oxidant stipple leaf necrosis and reduced growth and yield. There was significantly increased injury and reduced growth and yield at a high ozone dose for both types of distribution. The data indicate that with equal peak concentration and equivalent total dose, the constant square-wave, ozone concentration distributions in laboratory fumigations are adequate to describe mode of action and magnitude of response to ambient exposures.

Open Access