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  • Author or Editor: P. Lawrence Pusey x
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The stigmatic secretions of pomaceous flowers serve as a natural medium not only for pollen, but also for the pathogen Erwinia amylovora (Burr.) Winslow et al. and other microorganisms. To understand the microecology on the stigma, exudates from cultivars of pear (Pyrus communis L.), apple (Malus pumila P. Mill.), and crab apple [Malus mandshurica (Maxim.) Kom.] were analyzed for free sugars and free amino acids as available carbon and nitrogen sources. Extracts were obtained at different stages of anthesis by submerging and sonicating stigmas in water. Certain free sugars (glucose and fructose) and free amino acids (proline, asparagine, glutamic acid, and glutamine) were consistently predominant and increased during anthesis. Apple stigma extracts were also analyzed for polysaccharides and proteins. Of major components identified for apple, free sugars made up 4.5% by mass; polysaccharides (composed of arabinose and galactose), 49.6%; and proteins, 45.9%. The two largest components are likely present as glycoproteins. This may be the first report on characteristics of rosaceous stigma exudates that includes the identity of specific free sugars, free amino acids, and polysaccharide subcomponents. Discussion includes the comparison of pomaceous stigma exudates to those of other plants and the microecological implications.

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