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  • Author or Editor: P. Lanny Neel x
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Abstract

Trunk development of young container-grown trees was influenced by pruning and staking practices. The conventional nursery practice of staking and severely pruning laterals of container-grown trees produces plants which usually cannot stand without support when planted in the landscape. However trees were produced that were able to stand erect without staking by eliminating stakes during production, leaving lateral branches on the trunk, and spacing plants so their tops were free to move. Even though rigidly staked trees with lower limbs removed grew taller, they developed less caliper at the trunk base, much less taper to the trunk, and a smaller root system. Most of the trees staked during production, regardless of whether they were lightly or severely pruned, were not able to stand upright when planted out, while the unstaked trees needed no support.

Open Access

Abstract

The spacing of container-grown Betula verrucosa Ehrh., Eucalyptus sideroxylon A. Cunn., Dodonaea viscosa ‘Purpurea’ Jacq., and Liquidambar styraciflua L. was studied at 2 California locations in 1967 and 1968. As area per plant increased from can-to-can spacing, trunk caliper and taper increased, as did wt of roots and branches plus leaves, but increases in height and wt of trunk were less. At the closest spacings, the lower foliage was sparse, giving the trees a leggy appearance. Adequate spacing, about twice the can-to-can area, the first season gave benefits of increased trunk caliper and fuller foliage with a minimum sacrifice in height.

Open Access