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  • Author or Editor: P. E. Nugent x
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Abstract

C879-J1 and C879-J2 muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) breeding lines were released by the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in 1984. These lines are homozygous recessive for virescent v (2). They are useful for germplasm enhancement, species crosses, and isogenic line production, as well as for hybrid, pollination, genetic, and linkage studies.

Open Access

The southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita [(Kofoid & White) Chitwood], causes serious economic losses to melon (Cucumis melo L.) production in the United States. The present study was conducted to determine if separable differences in nematode resistance of Cucumis melo could be found at some inoculum level. Five C. melo lines were compared with Cucumis metuliferus Naud. (C701A), a highly resistant species, for root necrosis, galling, egg mass production, and reproduction when inoculated at 0, 500, 1000, 2000, or 5000 nematode eggs per plant. Using these criteria, melon line C880 inoculated with 1000 eggs per plant was highly susceptible, while PI140471, PI 183311, and the cultivars Chilton, Georgia 47, Gulf Coast, Planters Jumbo, and Southland were less susceptible. In greenhouse tests with an inoculum level of 1000 eggs per plant, low levels of resistance were evident. A thorough screening of the available germplasm against M. incognita may identify higher levels of root-knot nematode resistance for incorporation into improved melon cultivars.

Free access

Abstract

In the early 1970s, a study was begun to find resistance to feeding in muskmelon, Cucumis melo L., by banded cucumber beetles, Diabrotica balteata LeConte. Bitter seedlings were observed to be more susceptible to feeding than nonbitter seedlings. We noticed reduced damage levels in both bitter and nonbitter seedlings in 1974. Genetic study of resistant materials showed that in addition to the recessive form of the bitter gene, bibi, a 2nd recessive gene, cbl cbl, conditioned reduced seedling susceptibility. Subsequent tests involving spotted (Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber), striped [Acalymma vittata (Fabricius)], and banded beetles on leaf disks of several C. melo cultivare showed that homozygous double recessive, bibi cblcbl, plants were more resistant to all 3 species of cucumber beetles than nonbitter, bibi Cbl — and bitter Bi—Cbl— plants. This double-recessive resistance provides muskmelon breeders with germplasm which can be incorporated into breeding lines and hybrids.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Green Ice’ is a green-fleshed muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) adapted to the climatic conditions prevalent in the southeastern United States and is well-suited for both commercial and home garden production. It is a high-yielding ‘Honey Ball’-type muskmelon that produces round to oval, pale gray-green, medium-sized fruit that turn cream-colored and slip from the vine at maturity. The thick light-green flesh has a pleasing aroma and sweet flavor and is high in vitamin C. The vigorous plants are resistant to race 3 of powdery mildew [Spaerotheca fuliginea (Schlect ex Fr.) Poll.] and tolerant to most pests and environmental stresses of the region.

Open Access