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  • Author or Editor: O. M. Rogers x
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Abstract

A study was made on the effect of toluidine blue on the division of the generative nucleus in pollen tubes of Vinca rosea L. grown in vitro. Division was prevented in a percentage of pollen tubes, dependent on the concentration of the dye and duration of the treatment.

Open Access
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Abstract

Earlier references reported that toluidine blue would prevent the division of the generative nucleus in developing pollen tubes. These references suggested that a concommitant event might be stimulation of the embryo without fertilization resulting in the practical production of haploid seed. A test of this premise in tomatoes and corn is described herein. Haploids were not produced in excess of spontaneous levels. The probable cause is that fertilization of the diploid fusion nucleus does not occur. Thus there is no endosperm to provide a food supply for the embryo.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

The inheritance of male sterility in geranium is described and 2 genes, ms 1 and ms 2 are identified.

Open Access

Abstract

Rooting of cuttings of 4 clones of Mugo pine (Pinus mugo var. mughus Zeneri) averaged 75% when collected in June and dipped in a solution of 0.6% indolebutyric acid (IBA) plus 0.5% benomyl in 95% ethyl alcohol. Cuttings collected in March and June rooted better than those of September or December. Clones varied in rootability.

Open Access

Abstract

The inheritance of resistance to cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) in southern pea, Vigna sinensis (L.) Savi., Plant Introduction 255811, was determined in crosses with the susceptible cvs. Knuckle Purple Hull, Mississippi Silver, and Princess Anne. Segregation of F2 and backcross populations indicated that resistance to CCMV in P.I. 255811 is governed by 1 major recessive gene pair.

Open Access

SH and MS media, sucrose concentrations (6% and 10%) and types of support (0.25% Gelrite, vermiculite and filter paper bridge) were compared in a factorial experiment to determine the effects on growth of immature embryos from peach cultivar B611505. Embryos were measured at the beginning of the experiment (control) and all treatments were kept in the dark at room temperature, for 40 days. Although gelrite, over all media treatments, increased embryos wet weight by 66%, the embryos were soft and succulent and their dry weight increased only 37%. Vermiculite support, on the other hand, increased wet and dry weights by 63% and 79%, respectively. Less embryo growth occurred with MS medium and filter paper bridge. Except for vermiculite and SH medium, 10% sucrose was more effective than 6% in increasing embryo growth.

Free access

A major concern with many creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) putting greens is annual bluegrass (Poa annua) invasion. The study was designed to garner data regarding the depth of soil removal needed to reduce annual bluegrass seedling emergence in a newly renovated putting green. Research was conducted in different seasons (summer and fall) to evaluate seedling emergence across five soil removal depths in four sampling sites. Cores were collected from four golf courses in southeastern Michigan, subdivided into different soil removal depths, potted in sterile soil media, and established in a growth chamber. Results suggest that excavating soil to a depth of 1.0 inch or, more prudently, to a 1.5-inch depth could minimize annual bluegrass competition in a creeping bentgrass putting green. Annual bluegrass emergence was observed to be greatest in the upper soil depths (0.5–1.5 inches) in both seasons, with minimal emergence (<1.1 plant/0.2 ft2) below the 2.0-inch soil removal depth treatment.

Open Access

Results suggest that sand topdressing was more consistent at reducing dollar spot (Clarireedia jacksonii) in fairway turfgrass more so than rolling. This practice could be an effective cost-saving alternative to reduce frequent fungicide applications. Research was conducted from 2011 to 2014 on a simulated golf fairway and examined dollar spot severity responses in a mixed-stand of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) and annual bluegrass (Poa annua ssp. reptans) to sand topdressing and rolling. Treatments consisted of biweekly sand topdressing, rolling at three frequencies (one, three, or five times weekly), a control, and three replications. Infection was visually estimated. Sand topdressing significantly (P < 0.05) reduced disease up to 50% at the peak of the dollar spot activity in 2011, 2013, and 2014. Results on the effects of rolling on dollar spot were inconsistent.

Open Access