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  • Author or Editor: Nenita V. Desamero x
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Vitrification, a physiological disorder characteristic of in vitro grown plants, was observed in single-node cultures of sweet potato in mannitol-enriched medium during their second year of storage. Vitrified or vitreous sweet potato plantlets were watersoaked, translucent or glassy in appearance, with thick, swollen, leaves and stems, stunted shoot growth and poor root growth. These plantlets were not able to regenerate normal plants when transferred into fresh regeneration medium nor were they able to survive outside culture conditions.

Electron microscopy revealed changes in the ultrastructures of vitrified sweet potato plantlets. Vitrified plants had defective stomatal complex, starch grain-filled chloroplasts, disrupted cell wall, big air spaces (lacunae), high frequency of cell membrane separation from the cell wall, nuclear disintegration, and cytoplasmic disorganization. These changes in the internal structures of vitrified plants were reflected in their abnormal morphology and physiology.

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Vitrification, a physiological disorder characteristic of in vitro grown plants, was observed in single-node cultures of sweet potato in mannitol-enriched medium during their second year of storage. Vitrified or vitreous sweet potato plantlets were watersoaked, translucent or glassy in appearance, with thick, swollen, leaves and stems, stunted shoot growth and poor root growth. These plantlets were not able to regenerate normal plants when transferred into fresh regeneration medium nor were they able to survive outside culture conditions.

Electron microscopy revealed changes in the ultrastructures of vitrified sweet potato plantlets. Vitrified plants had defective stomatal complex, starch grain-filled chloroplasts, disrupted cell wall, big air spaces (lacunae), high frequency of cell membrane separation from the cell wall, nuclear disintegration, and cytoplasmic disorganization. These changes in the internal structures of vitrified plants were reflected in their abnormal morphology and physiology.

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