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Natalie Anderson* and David Byrne

Poor germination in Rosa has been an obstacle to breeding programs for years. Rose breeders generally stratify rose seed under cool, moist conditions for 4-10 weeks by planting directly into the seedling flat/bed or in a small container followed by planting the germinating seed into the seedling flat/bed. This experiment used 9 genotypes and compared these two approaches combined with variations in the stratification media (sand, perlite, sphagnum moss and Sunshine Mix #4). Over all stratification media and genotypes, germination was not influenced by whether the seed was stratified directly in the seedling flat/bed or in a small container. However, the process of transplantation of the delicate germinating seed from the small container to the flat/bed resulted in greater mortality of the germinating seedlings. he stratification media affected the germination of the rose seed. Sunshine Mix #4 gave the best germination as compared to all other media types tested. As expected the germination of the genotypes varied greatly, ranging from 0.7% to 37.1%.

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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Natalie Anderson and David H. Byrne

Poor germination in Rosa spp. has hindered breeding programs for years. Several methods exist to increase germination of rose seed. Unfortunately no consensus exists on the best method, or if any one method is best for all rose types. Rose seeds from a R. wichuraiana × Old Blush hybrid were broken into 3 replications with an average of 400 seeds per replication. Seeds were leached at room temperature with tap water for a period of 0, 3, 7, or 14 days. Constant filtration and aeration were supplied. After leaching, seeds were placed on either moist milled sphagnum moss or agar. Seeds were then placed in a cold stratification (≈2.8 °C) treatment for 8 to 12 weeks. Individual seedlings were planted when a root was visible. The combination of no leaching plus the moist milled sphagnum moss treatment significantly increased germination over leaching for 3 or more days and agar.

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David Shupert*, Natalie Anderson and David Byrne

Seedlings from three interspecific backcross rose populations derived from a F1 population were used to study inheritance of several traits in roses. Three F1 plants (WOB13, WOB21, and WOB26) from the hybridization of the diploid parents Rosa wichuraiana and `Old Blush' were backcrossed to `Old Blush' to produced three populations to observe the segregation of several morphological and disease resistance traits. The segregating rose traits in the backcrosses are no prickles on stems, non-recurrent blooming habit, white single flowers, black spot resistance, and powdery mildew resistance present in the Rosa wichuraiana parent compared to prickles on stems, recurrent blooming habit, pink double flowers, black spot susceptible, and powdery mildew susceptible present in the `Old Blush' parent. Visual data was collected for the segregating traits using color standards and rating scales as appropriate. The three populations expressed the segregating traits to varying degrees. Under the environmental conditions at College Station, Texas the population `Old Blush' × WOB26 had a greater expression of the traits for no prickles on stems, recurrent blooming habit, disease resistance to black spot, and disease resistance to powdery mildew, which are traits desired in breeding programs. The segregation of flower color (white/pink), and flower type (single, semi double, and double) were similar in all three populations.