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  • Author or Editor: N.E. Chestnut x
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Five-year-old `Napoleon' sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) trees were treated with single-application basal drenches of paclobutrazol (PBZ) in an attempt to regulate growth and flowering. Increasing concentrations of PBZ at 0.05 to 0.30 g·cm-1 trunk diameter reduced terminal extension the year of treatment and for at least the following 3 years. Fruit count increased on wood grown before treatment but decreased as annual growth declined following treatment. Fruit/cm growth generally increased, whereas fruit per flower bud decreased as PBZ concentration increased. No differences were found in fruit size, soluble solids concentration (SSC; 13% to 14%), or firmness of cherries harvested at brine maturity. Chemical name used: β-[(4-chlorophenyl) methyll-α- (l,l-dimethylethyl) -l-H-l,2,4-triazo1e-l-ethanol (paclobutrazol, PBZ).

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Abstract

In vivo pollen tube growth of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. cv. Tilton) was unaffected by air concentrations of pyrene or fluoranthene ranging from 0 to 4.7 μg/m3 and times of exposure from 16 to 48 hours. At similar exposure times and pollutant concentrations, pollen tube growth of ‘Van’ sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) in ‘Napoleon’ styles was reduced as In dose (hours exposure times pollutant concentration in μg/m3) of pyrene increased.

Open Access

Abstract

There was no reduction of surface pitting of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) or bruising in 7 trials over a 4-year period as a result of applications of CaCl2 from 950, 1400, or 3800 mg Ca/liter in single or multiple applications from 1 to 6 weeks before harvest. Cherry fruit firmness was increased and fruit size was decreased by increasing the amount of Ca applied in 3 out of 7 trials. The time of application, from shuck stage to 1 week before harvest, was not critical.

Open Access

Abstract

Multiple applications (1-3) of 10 and 50 ppm GA3 to ‘Bing’ and ‘Lambert’ (Prunus avium L.) sweet cherries increased fruit firmness and weight, and delayed harvest. Firmness was positively related to dose of GA3 (number of applications × concentration), soluble solids (SS), and In leaf/fruit ratio. GA3 interacted with SS so that the effect of GA3 dose on firmness was increased at higher SS levels. Fruit coloring was delayed by GA3. Chemical name used: gibberellic acid (GA3).

Open Access

Gibberellic acid-treated `Napoleon' sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit were firmer but lost more weight during brining than nontreated fruit. GA treatment delayed fruit softening, thereby extending the harvest period. Mean fruit weight was increased by GA only in fruit harvested at a more mature state. GA delayed soluble solids accumulation in one of two years. In one orchard district, solution pockets were less frequent in GA -treated fruit in 1988 and in late-harvested GA -treated fruit in 1989. GA treatment did not alter the incidence of fruit with solution pockets in a second district in 1988 and increased levels of solution pockets in fruit harvested later in 1989. Incidence of fruit with solution pockets increased as maturity progressed in nontreated fruit in both years and both districts. Chemical name used: gibberellic acid (G A).

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