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  • Author or Editor: N. S. Mansour x
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Abstract

Floating row covers increased air and soil temperatures compared to black polyethylene ground mulch and increased both early and total yield of muskmelon [Cucumis melo (L.)]. In 1983, all 3 row covers increased transplant survival and total yield/plant but decreased mean fruit weight. Cover removal date had little effect on yield or earliness. Due to greater plant survival, total yields were higher with perforated (PCP) and slitted clear polyethylene (SCP) floating covers than with spunbonded polyester (SPE) covers. Direct-seeded plants under floating SCP produced higher total yields and reached peak production earlier than the noncovered transplants. In 1984, SPE and PCP increased yield and earliness but had no effect on mean fruit weight. Transplants outyielded direct-seeded plants and early yield increased with late row cover removal. Neither total nor early yield were significantly affected by type of row cover. Projected economic return was usually increased by the row covers for both transplants and direct-seeded plants.

Open Access

Abstract

Green bunching onion (Allium cepa L.) is a high-value crop that is seeded nearly year around in western Oregon. Late winter and early spring plantings often result in unsatisfactory stands because of low soil temperatures, excessive precipitation, and soil crusting. A method to speed emergence and improve stands would benefit growers.

Open Access

Abstract

Several compounds were used to desiccate tops of onion (Allium cepa L.) prior to harvest. Most chemicals at various rates and timings caused an increase in postharvest disease and sprouting. Endothall at 1.1 kg active ingredient/ha had storage losses comparable to the control. Paraquat substantially elevated storage decay at all rates, but there was less increase from Ethephon and Stoddard Solvent. Disease in storage was not correlated with neck moisture as affected by spray treatments. Phenolic concentration in neck tissue studied for several treatments was weakly and negatively correlated with subsequent disease in storage.

Open Access

Abstract

An accurate, rapid, and simple method of determining % moisture of cultivars of sweet corn (Zea mays L.) using a microwave oven is described. Working with corn in the moisture range of 65.5 to 72.4%, it was possible to obtain readings within ± 1% of those obtained with the standard 24-hour vacuum oven method.

Open Access