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  • Author or Editor: N. C. Hayslip x
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Abstract

Fruit shown on the cover are the ‘Florida MH-1’ tomatoes – harvested fully red-ripe1 and packed 2-layers deep in cartons of 20-pound capacity. Taking advantage of the attractive red color and retention of firmness of the cultivar, researchers at the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), Univ. of Florida have accumulated data which indicate machine-harvestable red ripe fruit without excessive damage, the possibility of portable field packing units, and high consumer acceptance and/or preference. As a result of this continuing program, retail produce markets may soon display high quality winter tomatoes more like those “grandma used to grow.”

Open Access

Abstract

‘Welder’ is a bronze muscadine grape, Vitis rotundifolia Michx., developed by a private grape grower of that name in Lake County, Florida. ‘Welder’ is vigorous, high yielding, self fertile, and suitable for both wine and fresh fruit consumption (Fig. 1).

Open Access

Abstract

Supermarket sales of ‘Florida MH-1’ tomatoes which had been harvested fully red-ripe were compared with those of ‘Floradel’ tomatoes which had been harvested at the pink stage. The two lots of tomatoes were handled in the same manner. Customers preferred the red-ripe fruit over the pink. This preference became more pronounced during the 14 shopping days included in the test.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Christian Dior’ and ‘Happiness’ roses on Rosa fortuniana stock, fertilized with 3 rates each of N, P, and K factorially combined, were grown for 3 years at Ft. Pierce, Florida. All fertilizer was applied at the beginning of the experiment under plastic mulch just before the bushes were planted. About 2300 lb./A of N on ‘Christian Dior’ and 2100 lb. on ‘Happiness’ produced the greatest number of flowers. Leaf N at 18 months was also maximized by 2100 lb. N. Nitrogen levels maximizing stem lengths were slightly lower. The independent effects of P were minor and low levels best, perhaps because residual soil P at start of the study was adequate. Flower production decreased with K fertilization beyond low rates, whereas stem lengths increased to a max at about 1700 lb./A. At times, various nutrient interactions were noted. ‘Christian Dior’ consistently yielded more flowers than ‘Happiness’. With minor exceptions, ‘Happiness’ had longer stems.

Open Access