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  • Author or Editor: Muraleedharan G. Nair x
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Seedcoat color in dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is associated with physical and chemical characteristics of the seed. Allelic substitutions at a single or several seedcoat color determining loci were found to influence several seed characteristics. Whole bean fresh and dry mass and the ratios of seedcoat mass to whole bean dry mass differed significantly among nine seedcoat color genotypes. Dry mass of seedcoat increased significantly as total bean dry mass increased. Genotypes VOO59 and VO400 had the largest masses of whole dry bean, lowest ratios of seedcoat to whole bean dry weight, and the lightest colored seedcoats of the nine genotypes. In general, compared to VOO59 and VO400, the smaller seeded and darkly colored genotypes had significantly higher ratios of seedcoat to whole bean dry masses. Differences among color genotypes for seed physical characteristics are useful to estimate the fresh mass of seed needed to effectively extract seedcoat flavonoid color compounds.

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Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of aqueous extracts of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) cover crops on germination and radicle elongation in seven vegetable and six weed species. Lyophilized aqueous extracts of the cover crops were dissolved in reverse osmosis (RO) water to produce seven concentrations: 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, 4.00, and 8.00 g·L–1. Each treatment had 4 replications and the full experiment was repeated. Experiment 1 (E1) and Experiment (E2) were conducted under similar conditions. In general, seed germination was not affected by extracts of both cover crops. However, radicle growth of all species tested (except common milkweed exposed to cowpea extract) was affected by the cover crop residue extracts. Low concentrations of hairy vetch extract stimulated the radicle growth of carrot, pepper, barnyardgrass, common milkweed, and velvetleaf. Likewise, low concentrations of cowpea extract stimulated the growth of corn, barnyardgrass, and velvetleaf. At higher concentrations all species tested were negatively affected. The order of species sensitivity to the hairy vetch extract, as determined by the IC50 (concentration required to produce 50% radicle inhibition) values, was common chickweed > redroot pigweed> barnyardgrass E1 > carrot E1 > wild carrot > corn > carrot E2 > lettuce > common milkweed > tomato > onion > barnyardgrass E2 > velvetleaf > pepper > cucumber (most sensitive to least sensitive). For cowpea the order was common chickweed > redroot pigweed > corn > tomato > lettuce > wild carrot > pepper > carrot > cucumber > onion> barnyardgrass and velvetleaf. Results suggest that the susceptibility of weeds and vegetable crops to aqueous extracts of hairy vetch and cowpea is dependent on both species and extract concentration.

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Actinomycetes were isolated from asparagus field soil and bioassayed against Fusarium spp. in petri dishes. Extracts of the active organisms were bioassayed to determine if inhibition was caused by competition or antibiosis. The most active, antibiotic-producing organism was inoculated into test tubes with asparagus and Fusarium and evaluated for disease control. Asparagus seedlings were dipped in actinomycete suspension before planting in Fusarium-infested soil. These seedlings were evaluated for disease incidence after 8 weeks. Asparagus crowns could be dipped in actinomycete suspension before planting in the field.

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Several plant species that are not consumed by animals were collected, extracted with organic solvents, and tested at different venues for their effectiveness as animal feeding repellents. Species with the most repellent activity were daffodil (Narcissus pseudo narcissus), bearded iris (Iris sp.), hot pepper (Capsicum frutescens), catnip (Nepeta cataria) and peppermint (Mentha piperita). Considerable effort was expended to isolate and identify compounds from these species responsible for repellent activity. Eight chemicals have been isolated and purified, and four of them have been identified. Both daffodil and catnip contain more than one repellent, but none of the four compounds identified were common to both species. Combinations of extracts from more than one plant species proved to have more repellent activity than extracts from individual species used alone. In several tests these plant extracts proved to be as effective or better than available commercial repellents. A plethora of additives and surfactants were tested to increase repellent activity by enhancing the spreading, penetration or persistence of the extracts.

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Faeriefungin, an antibiotic produced by the actinomycete Streptomyces griseus var. autotrophicus MSU-32058/ATCC 53668, was tested in field trials on golf course fairways to determine if it could control annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) summer patch effectively. Test sites with a history of severe summer patch outbreaks caused by Magnaporthe poae Landschoot and Jackson were chosen for study. Faeriefungin, when applied as a drench at 0.74 kg·ha-1, effectively controlled summer patch and was not significantly different than the fungicide fenarimol in three of four field trials. Faeriefungin may be an alternative to chemically controlling summer patch disease.

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Previous research has shown that maple (Acer spp.) leaf litter resulted in fewer common dandelions (Taraxacum officinale) when mulched into established turfgrass. However, the leaves used in that research may have contained herbicide residues and were separated by genus, not species. Our research compared the effects of pesticide-free mulched maple and oak (Quercus spp.) leaves on dandelion populations in an established kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) stand maintained as a residential lawn on sandy loam soil. The objectives of this study were to quantify the effectiveness of maple or oak leaf mulches as an organic common dandelion control method and to identify which maple species and rates (particle size and rate per unit area) provided the most effective control. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with treatments arranged as a 5 × 2 × 2 + 1 factorial, with tree leaf species, leaf particle size, leaf application rate, and control as main factors. Leaf species were red maple (Acer rubrum), silver maple (A. saccharinum), sugar maple (A. saccharum), high sugar content sugar maple, and red oak (Quercus rubra). Particle sizes were coarse (0.4–1.0 inch2) and fine (≤0.2 inch2), and application rates were low (0.5 kg·m−2) and high (1.5 kg·m−2). Mulch applications were made in Fall 2003 and 2004 and data were collected beginning in Spring 2004 on kentucky bluegrass spring green-up, and common dandelion plant counts. The high application rate, regardless of tree genus or species, resulted in the highest green-up ratings. Common dandelion plant counts after one (2003) and two (2003 and 2004) mulch applications at the high rate showed that up to 80% and 53% reduction was achieved, respectively. Results indicate that mulching leaves regardless of genus (oak or maple) or maple species into established turfgrass as a leaf litter disposal method will increase spring green-up and contribute to a reduction in common dandelion population.

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