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Phillip Griffiths, Molly Jahn, and Mike Dickson

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Mark J. Henning, Henry M. Munger, and Molly M. Jahn

`Hannah's Choice F1' is a new, high quality eastern type muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) with multiple disease resistance. It was developed in the Department of Plant Breeding at the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station in Ithaca, N.Y. It is well adapted for northeastern U.S. conditions and shows potential for good adaptation in the northwest. With multiple disease resistance it is well suited for home gardeners, market gardeners, and commercial growers. `Hannah's Choice F1' has excellent resistance to powdery mildew races 1 and 2 (Podosphaera xanthi) and some tolerance to Fusarium root rot (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis) race 2. In addition, it has resistance to watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). This is the first commercial melon to have combined resistance to these three potyviruses. Also, it has shown some field tolerance to spider mites (Tetranychus urticae). Lastly, it has shown some field tolerance to downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis), angular leaf spot (Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans), and gummy stem blight (Didymella bryoniae). In 2001, 2002, and 2003 it was grown in replicated trials in New York and in 2002 and 2003 in Oregon.

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Mark J. Henning, Henry M. Munger, and Molly M. Jahn

`PMR Delicious 51' is a new and improved version of the `Delicious 51' eastern type melon (Cucumis melo L.). It was developed in the Department of Plant Breeding at the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station in Ithaca, N.Y. It is well adapted for northeastern U.S. conditions and shows potential for good adaptation in the northwest. It is well suited for home gardeners, market gardeners, and commercial growers who want to grow an open-pollinated (OP) melon. `PMR Delicious 51' has excellent resistance to powdery mildew races 1 and 2 (Podosphaera xanthi) and resistance to fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis) race 2.

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James D. Frantz, Jeffrey Gardner, Michael P. Hoffmann, and Molly M. Jahn

A greenhouse screen for resistance to green peach aphid (GPA) [Myzus persicae (Sulzer)] was done using 50 pepper (Capsicum spp.) accessions. There were significant differences among accessions for damage rating, number of aphids per plant and number of aphids per leaf. Leaf pubescence, the basis of a reported nonpreference resistance mechanism to green peach aphid infestation, failed to protect pepper accessions from GPA colonization and damage. Sources of resistance and tolerance to cotton aphid [Aphis gossypi (Glover)] supported high levels of green peach aphid infestation and exhibited considerable damage. Although no accessions provided strong resistance to aphid colonization evident by significantly reduced numbers of aphids, several commercial varieties and sources of virus resistance exhibited strong tolerance to GPA, evident as reduced damage. Tolerant varieties could be an important component in integrated pest management of green peach aphid.

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James D. Frantz, Jeffrey Gardner, Michael P. Hoffmann, and Molly M. Jahn

A replicated greenhouse evaluation of a range of commercial and noncommercial (Capsicum spp.) accessions for resistance to european corn borer (ECB) [Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner)] was conducted. Percentage of fruit damaged was observed among 29 accessions four weeks after plants were artificially infested with ECB egg masses. Small-fruited peppers generally showed lower levels of damage, while large-fruited peppers were the most susceptible. Genotypes with elongate fruit were less damaged than those with bell-shaped fruit. Resistance to fruit damage was also associated with increasing pungency level, with two notable exceptions. The pungent genotype `Large Red Thick Cayenne' was significantly more susceptible than many of the other pungent accessions tested. The relative susceptibility of this accession may be related to large fruit size. The nonpungent pepper `Corno di Toro' showed significantly lower percent fruit damage than other nonpungent peppers including `Banana Supreme' with roughly similar fruit size, ranking amidst highly pungent peppers such as `Red Scotch Bonnet'. These results confirm that resistance to ECB can be identified in nonpungent Capsicum genotypes and demonstrate that pungency is not always correlated with ECB damage. Reported sources of aphid resistance or tolerance showed good levels of ECB resistance, but interpretation of these results was confounded by the presence of pungency.

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Kyle E. LaPlant, Lindsay E. Wyatt, George Moriarty, Maryann Fink-Brodnicki, Molly Jahn, and Michael Mazourek

Jack-o’-lantern pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo ssp. pepo) is an economically important crop grown for fall decoration in the United States, and they are traditionally carved and illuminated for display during the holiday of Halloween. In 2014, over 20,000 ha of pumpkins were planted in the United States, with a farm value of $145 million. The state of New York is one of the highest ranked states in value of production each year, often first in the nation. In 2014, the total farm value of the pumpkin crop in New York was $20.5 million, making jack-o’-lantern pumpkins a

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Jason Cavatorta, George Moriarty, Michael Glos, Mark Henning, Mary Kreitinger, Michael Mazourek, Henry Munger, and Molly Jahn

The ‘Marketmore’ series has long been a standard for disease resistance in cucumber. ‘Boothby's Blonde’ is a cucumber heirloom praised by growers for its distinctive appearance, earliness, and eating qualities but is highly susceptible to fungal diseases. We report the development of the monoecious open-pollinated cucumber ‘Salt and Pepper’ that combines the desirable qualities of ‘Marketmore 97’ and Boothby's Blonde’. The fruit of ‘Salt and Pepper’ is white with black spines like that of ‘Boothby's Blonde’ but has foliar powdery mildew resistance. Selection of ‘Salt and Pepper’ was performed on USDA-certified organic ground, making it one of the first commercially

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Jason Cavatorta, George Moriarty, Mark Henning, Michael Glos, Mary Kreitinger, Henry M. Munger, and Molly Jahn

‘Marketmore 97’ is the most recent addition to a series of disease-resistant slicing cucumbers developed in the Cornell University Department of Plant Breeding. The fruit have green skin with white spines and an average length and diameter of 18.8 cm and 4.8 cm, respectively. Broad resistance to a number of destructive diseases and insects makes this cultivar well-suited to low-input agricultural systems at the scale of the home gardener or the commercial grower. In addition to the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), cucumber scab (Cladosporium cucumerinum Ell. & Arth.), downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis Berk & Curtis), and powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca fuliginea Schl. ex Fr.) resistances of ‘Marketmore 76’, ‘Marketmore 97’ contains resistance to alternaria leaf spot [Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keis.], Ulocladium leaf spot (Ulocladium cucurbitae Let. & Roum.), target leaf spot (Corynespora cassiicola Berk. & Curt.), watermelon mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus. Furthermore, the bitterfree character of this cultivar is responsible for nonpreference of the striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum Fab.) and spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber). Finally, a near isogenic line of ‘Marketmore 97’ is available that is gynoecious. A replicated trial of ‘Marketmore 97’ conducted in New York in 2006 confirmed comparable yield and quality to other Marketmore cultivars.

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Lindsay E. Wyatt, Amara R. Dunn, Matthew Falise, Stephen Reiners, Molly Jahn, Christine D. Smart, and Michael Mazourek

Phytophthora capsici is an oomycete pathogen that causes disease on bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) and many other vegetable crops globally. Newly developed bell pepper inbred lines have been shown to be resistant to P. capsici and have been previously evaluated for green harvest yield. Nine P. capsici-resistant inbred lines and three commercial cultivars were evaluated for red harvest yield and fruit characteristics at three sites and disease resistance was evaluated through field inoculation studies. Three of the P. capsici-resistant lines were further evaluated as hybrid parents by measuring hybrid yield and disease resistance. P. capsici-resistant lines had excellent disease resistance and provided high levels of resistance to F1 hybrids. Inbred lines had comparable yields to the commercial cultivars, but fruit were smaller in size and weight. These lines are suitable for use as inbred lines for markets where small fruit size is acceptable and have potential for use as hybrid parents.

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Michael Mazourek, George Moriarty, Michael Glos, Maryann Fink, Mary Kreitinger, Elizabeth Henderson, Greg Palmer, Ammie Chickering, Danya L. Rumore, Deborah Kean, James R. Myers, John F. Murphy, Chad Kramer, and Molly Jahn

‘Peacework’ is a new open-pollinated, early red bell pepper cultivar with Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) resistance developed for and within organic systems. Development of this cultivar was conducted at Cornell University's Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics in Ithaca, NY, and Freeville Organic Research Farm in Freeville, NY, as well as at the farms of members of the Organic Seed Partnership (OSP) and in cooperation with the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York. ‘Peacework’ is well adapted to northeastern and northwestern U.S. growing conditions and also provides CMV resistance that could be transferred to peppers adapted to