Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Milton Workman x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

‘Russet Burbank’ seed potatoes, 4 to 6 oz. in weight, were stored at 0° and 5°C in various levels of O2 and CO2. Periodically during the storage season samples were removed for observation of sprouting behavior, bud and parenchyma tissue respiration measurements and determination of the rate of leakage of electrolytes from tissue sections. The performance of the remaining seed potatoes at the end of storage was evaluated in randomized complete block field trials.

The degree of CO2 toxicity was increased by decreasing the O2 concentrations and the temperature of the storage environment. Occasionally a reduction in performance with increases in storage CO2 occurred but more frequently an abrupt drop from good performance to failure resulted. Incipient toxicity during the storage season could occasionally be detected by an increase in the rate of CO2 evolution from potato buds and increase in electrolyte leakage.

Open Access

Abstract

Experiments were conducted to determine if changes in tuber ascorbic acid content following bruising were related to blackspot susceptibility in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Tubers of four potato clones were bruised at three locations. Ascorbic acid content of bruised and nonbruised tissue on the same tubers was determined 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hr after bruising. Differences in initial ascorbic acid content between clones were highly significant, but not related to blackspot susceptibility. Differences in ascorbic acid content between bruised and nonbruised tissue of a tuber were significant in two of the four clones. Changes in ascorbic acid content of tubers with time occurred to a similar extent in bruised and nonbruised tissue. This experiment indicates that factors other than ascorbic acid content may determine differences in clonal susceptibility to blackspot.

Open Access