Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 35 items for

  • Author or Editor: Mikal E. Saltveit x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Mikal E. Saltveit

Holding harvested asparagus spears at non-freezing temperatures below 2.5 °C induces chilling injury (CI), a physiological disorder that reduces quality and shelf life. CI can be quantified by subjective visual parameters, or by objective measurements of the increased rate of ion leakage from excised tissue into an isotonic bathing solution. The rate of ion leakage from apical (2–3 cm), middle (9–10 cm), and basal (15–16 cm) segments excised from 18-cm asparagus spears increased after 7 days of chilling at 2.5 °C. The increase continued and was similar for middle and basal segments after 14 days of chilling, but more pronounced from apical segments. Various heat-shock treatments (i.e., combinations of temperature and duration) decreased the chilling-induced increase in ion leakage from these 1-cm stem segments. Although the chilling tolerance of all spear segments was increased by specific heat-shock treatments, the optimal temperature and duration of exposure varied among the segments; some treatments that were effective in segments from one location were either ineffective or damaging to segments from another location. As the apical half of the whole spear is the predominant culinary portion and contains the most chilling sensitive tissue, heat-shock treatments that would increase the chilling tolerance of the upper half of whole spears were selected for further study. These heat-shock treatments were applied to freshly harvested whole 18-cm asparagus spears that were chilled at 2.5 °C for 14 days. Two treatment combinations (i.e., 45 °C for 4.0 ± 0.6 minutes or 50 °C for 2.9 ± 0.8 minutes) were identified that maintained the highest level of quality and significantly reduced the rate of chilling-induced ion leakage.

Free access

Mikal E. Saltveit

The cessation of protoplasmic streaming is one of the first observable effects of chilling in sensitive plant tissue. If the lack of protoplasmic streaming contributes to the development of chilling injury, then impeding protoplasmic streaming at the chilling threshold temperature should induce chilling injury symptoms in tissue that would normally not exhibit symptoms at that temperature. A centrifuge was constructed to subject entire germinating cucumber (Cucumis sativus L., cv. Poinsett 76) seeds to centrifugal forces of up to 20 xg at 2.5, 10 and 12.5°C. Subjecting cucumber seeds with 5-mm-long radicles to high centrifugal forces (18 xg) at a marginal chilling temperature of 10°C for up to 3 days had no significant effect on subsequent radicle elongation of the entire population. In one experiment, spun seedlings were 7.4 ± 0.52 cm long, while the controls were 6.1 ± 4.3 cm long after 48 hr at 25°C. When analyzed by individual seed, the spinning treatments had no effect on high-vigor seedlings, while an 18 xg treatment significantly improved subsequent radicle elongation of low vigor seedlings. The effect of increased centrifugal forces on the respiration, metabolism and chilling sensitivity of cucumber seedlings will be discussed.

Free access

Abdur Rab and Mikal E. Saltveit

Chilling sensitivity increased as the radicle of germinating corn (Zea mays L. `Jubilee' hybrid), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. `Poinsett 76'), mung bean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb. `Berkin'), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `Rio Grande') seeds increased in length from 1 to 7 mm. In contrast, radicles of germinating okra (Hibiscus esculentus L. `Clemson' spineless) seeds exhibited similar levels of chilling sensitivity at all radicle lengths. The degree of chilling sensitivity varied among the species in relation to time required to elicit a significant response and the magnitude of the elicited response. Based on subsequent radicle elongation, okra and cucumber were the most sensitive species to chilling at 2.5C for 96 h; tomato and corn were relatively less sensitive, and mung bean was the least sensitive. This pattern of sensitivities changed when other criteria were used to evaluate chilling sensitivity. The development of lateral roots decreased with prolonged chilling in all species, except for corn in which the apical tip remained viable even after 192 h of chilling. Heat shock (0 to 10 min at 45C) induced chilling tolerance in all species, except okra. In okra, neither increasing the heat shock temperature nor decreasing the severity of chilling (i.e., temperature and duration of exposure) resulted in a significant reduction in chilling injury. The differential induction of heat shock proteins in okra and the other species is discussed.

Free access

Abdur Rab and Mikal E. Saltveit

The sensitivity of corn, cucumber, mung bean, and tomato seedling radicles to chilling (i.e., inhibition of subsequent elongation at 25 C after chilling at 2.5 C) was greater for radicles 5 to 7 mm long than for radicles 1 mm long. In contrast, radicles of germinating okra seeds had a similar level of chilling inhibition (i.e., 70% to 90%) at lengths of 1 to 7 mm. For seeds with 1-mm-long radicles, subsequent radicle elongation for cucumber was inhibited only 2% by 72 hours of chilling at 2.5 C, while it was inhibited about 20% for corn, mung bean, and tomato. For seeds with 5- to 7-mm-long radicles, chilling inhibition was 50% to 70% for corn, mung bean, and tomato and 80% to 90% for cucumber and okra. The degree of chilling sensitivity varied among species in relation to time required to elicit a significant response and the magnitude of the elicited response. The development of lateral roots decreased with prolonged chilling in all species. Heat shock (i.e., 4 to 10 minutes at 45 C) induced chilling tolerance in all species except okra. In okra, neither increasing the heat-shock temperature nor decreasing the severity of chilling (i.e., temperature and duration of exposure) significantly reduced chilling injury.

Free access

Abdur Rab and Mikal E. Saltveit

Germinating `Poinsett 76' cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seeds are chilling sensitive, and subsequent radicle elongation is inhibited by exposure to nonfreezing temperatures below 10 °C. Reorienting germinated seeds with 5-mm-long radicles from a vertical to a horizontal position induced gravitropic curvature within 2 hours at 10 to 25 °C without significantly affecting the rate of radicle elongation. However, neither elongation nor curvature occurred in similar seeds held at 2.5 or 5 °C. Chilling seeds with 5-mm-long radicles at 2.5 °C for 18 hours significantly reduced the subsequent rate of radicle elongation at 25 °C by 47% compared with nonchilled control, while gravitropic curvature was reduced by only 34%. After 36 hours of recovery at 25 °C, the difference was even more pronounced; elongation was reduced by 26% while curvature was reduced by only 6%. Clearly, gravitropic curvature was less chilling sensitive than radicle elongation, despite the fact that differential elongation of cells in the radicle are needed to produce curvature. Exposing seeds with 5-mm-long radicles to a heat shock of 45 °C for 4 to 10 minutes significantly diminished the chilling-induced reduction in radicle elongation and gravitropic curvature.

Free access

Paul Jennings and Mikal E. Saltveit

Unlike horticulturally mature fruit of `Dasher II' and `Poinsett 76' cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.), two cultivars that differ significantly in their level of chilling tolerance, imbibing and germinating seeds of these two cultivars responded similarly to chilling temperatures (e.g., increases in fresh weight, time to radicle emergence, and root growth). `Dasher II' and `Poinsett 76' seeds were imbibed and germinated at 10 to 30C, and seeds germinated at 25C for 24 h were chilled at 2.5C for various durations. In comparison, seeds from an aged lot of `Poinsett 76' seed (1989) responded very differently from the 1992 seed lots in all experiments. The chilling tolerance level of germinating `Poinsett 76' seed varied with the seedling age as measured by resumption of root growth. Our results suggest that some factor that confers chilling tolerance is gradually lost during the early stages of germination following imbibition.

Free access

Mary E. Mangrich and Mikal E. Saltveit

Chilling 10-mm cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. `Poinsett 76') radicles at 2.5 °C reduced their subsequent growth during 3 days at 25 °C. The reduction in radicle growth was linear for 1 to 3 days of chilling but then increased substantially until subsequent radicle growth was all but eliminated by 6 days of chilling. Heat shocks of 40 °C applied for 4 to 12 min increased chilling tolerance such that 4 days of chilling caused only a 36% decrease in radicle growth compared to 66% for seedlings not heat shocked, which brought the response in line with the responses of the non-heat-shocked seeds chilled for 1 to 3 days. Eight-minute heat shocks applied before 5 days of chilling resulted in a 45% inhibition of subsequent growth, compared to 82% for chilled non-heat-shocked controls. Heat shocks applied before 3 days of chilling did not result in a significant increase in subsequent growth compared to the non-heat-shocked controls chilled for 3 days. Heat shocks were only able to protect that part of radicle growth that was in excess of the linear decrease in radicle growth. There appears to be two effects of chilling on radicle growth. The first is linear and cannot be affected by heat shocks. The second is much more severe and can be prevented by heat shocks. Seeds were selected for three categories of vigor according to the rate at which their radicles grew to 10 mm. Seeds classified with different vigors neither responded significantly differently to 3 days exposure to 2.5 °C nor did they respond differently to chilling stress following application of heat shocks.

Free access

Mary E. Mangrich and Mikal E. Saltveit

Crops with origins in tropics and subtropics undergo physiological injury when subjected to nonfreezing temperatures below 12°C. Application of heat and chemical shocks to tissue prior to chilling induces chilling tolerance. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of low oxygen and high carbon dioxide atmospheres on subsequent chilling tolerance. Cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L., cv. Poinsett 76) with radicles 8 to 12 mm long were subjected to 0% to 21% oxygen and/or 0% to 20% CO2 atmospheres for 0 to 72 hr at 2.5 or 15°C. After chilling, they were placed at 25°C for three additional days. Radicle growth was used to assess chilling injury. Modification of the individual germination plates was necessary to ensure seedling exposure to the desired atmospheres. Chilling injury was reduced by exposure to oxygen levels below 1% and to carbon dioxide levels above 5%. Effects of brief exposures were small in comparison to prolonged exposures during chilling. Seed to seed variability was high and obscured some results. The effects of the various atmospheres were greater with the less vigorous seedlings.