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Michael J. Roll and Steven E. Newman

The rooting efficiency of cuttings from three poinsettia cultivars were evaluated after regulating the photoperiod during the stock plant stage. `Freedom Red', `Monet', and `V-17 Angelika Marble' stock plants were exposed to an extended photoperiod and to natural day length during September 1995. `Freedom Red' cuttings rooted more quickly under an extended photoperiod compared to those under natural day length. Furthermore, root dry weight from these cuttings was greater than cuttings from stock plants grown under natural day length. `Monet' cuttings also rooted more quickly when the stock plants were under an extended photoperiod, and showed similar differences in root weight as `Freedom Red'. Cuttings from `V-17 Angelika Marble' were not influenced by photoperiod. Lighting stock plants to block flower initiation produces a higher quality cutting when propagation takes place after the critical day length for flowering has passed.

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Michael J. Roll and Steven E. Newman

Rooting of cuttings from three cultivars of Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. was evaluated after regulating the photoperiod during the stock plant stage. One group of stock plants was exposed to a night break (4 hours) and another group was exposed to natural daylength during September. Cuttings harvested in late September from `Freedom Red' and `Monet' stock plants grown under the 4-hour night break rooted more rapidly and had greater root mass than `Freedom Red' and `Monet' grown under natural daylength, whereas rooting of cuttings from `V-17 Angelika Marble' was not influenced by the photoperiods tested. Using a night break to prevent flower initiation of stock plants produced a higher-quality cutting when propagation took place after the critical daylength for flowering had passed.

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Michael J. Roll, Steven E. Newman and Ronald J. Harkrader

A formulation of quaternary benzophenathridine alkaloids (QBA) was combined with piperalin as a tank mix. The QBA was applied at 150 mg/L and piperalin, at the labeled rate, was applied as a spray application to greenhouse roses infected with Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae (powdery mildew). Copper sulfate pentahydrate and fenarimol were also applied to mildew-infected plants within the same greenhouse at their respective label rates for comparison. Initial infection for the QBA/piperalin combination spray was 45% of the leaflet surface area, 3 days after application the infection was reduced to 10%, 6 days after application infection was reduced to 5%, and 14 days after application the infection remained at 5%. Initial infection for a QBA application without piperalin was 25% of the leaflet surface area. Three days after application, the infection was reduced to 15%; 6 days after application the infection remained at 15%; and 14 days after application, the infection was reduced to 10%. The data reveals that the QBA/piperalin combination gives a short-term as well as a long-term fungicidal and fungistatic activity.

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Steven E. Newman, Michael J. Roll and Ronald J. Harkrader

Quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloids (QBAs) isolated from plants in the family Papaveraceae are effective for the control of some fungal diseases. Extracts from Macleaya cordata, a species rich in QBAs, were formulated at 150 mg·L–1 QBA for spray application to greenhouse roses infected with Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae (powdery mildew). The QBA formulation was applied at 10-day intervals. For comparison, copper sulfate pentahydrate, piperalin, and fenarimol also were applied to mildew-infected plants within the same greenhouse at their respective labeled rates. One day after treatment, visible symptoms of mildew infection were reduced 60% by QBA, whereas fenarimol, copper sulfate pentahydrate, and piperalin reduced the symptoms of infection 50%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Subsequent studies demonstrated that a tank mix of QBA and piperalin provided enhanced control of powdery mildew on rose. Results from this study indicate that QBAs have the potential to be developed as a biorational fungicide for greenhouse use with both fungicidal and fungistatic activity.

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Steven E. Newman, Michael J. Roll and Ronald J. Harkrader

There are many naturally occurring substances that have the potential to be adapted to modern pest control chemistry. Azadirachtin, an insect growth regulator, is one such naturally occurring compound that has been widely accepted in insect pest management. Quartenary benzophenanthridine alkaloids (QBAs) are known to be effective in the control of crop damaging fungal diseases. QBAs can be isolated from plants in the Papaveraceae. Extracts of Macleaya cordata, a species rich in QBAs, were formulated at 150 mg·L–1 QBA for spray application to greenhouse roses infected with Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae (powdery mildew). The QBA formulation was applied at 10-day intervals. Copper sulfate pentahydrate (Phyton27), piperalin (Pipron), and fenarimol (Rubigan) were also applied to mildew infected plants within the same greenhouse at their respective label rates for comparison. One day after treatment, the mildew infection was reduced 50% by QBA, whereas fenarimol, copper sulfate pentahydrate, and piperalin reduced the infection 50%, 75%, and 80%, respectively. Nine days after application, the mildew infection of QBA treated plants was less than 5% of the leaflet surface area. QBAs have the potential to be developed as a biorational fungicide for greenhouse use with both fungicidal and fungistatic activity.

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Steven E. Newman, Michael J. Roll and Ronald J. Harkrader

Quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloids (QBAs) isolated from plants in the family Papaveraceae are effective for the control of some fungal diseases. Extracts from Macleaya cordata, a species rich in QBAs, were formulated at 150 mg·L–1 QBA for spray application to greenhouse roses (Rosa sp.) infected with Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae (powdery mildew). The QBA formulation was applied at 10-day intervals. For comparison, copper sulfate pentahydrate, piperalin, and fenarimol also were applied to mildewinfected plants within the same greenhouse at their respective labeled rates. One day after treatment, visible symptoms of mildew infection were reduced 60% by QBA, whereas fenarimol, copper sulfate pentahydrate, and piperalin reduced the symptoms of infection 50%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Subsequent studies demonstrated that a tank mix of QBA and piperalin provided enhanced control of powdery mildew on rose. Results from this study indicate that QBAs have the potential to be developed as a biorational fungicide for greenhouse use with both fungicidal and fungistatic activity.

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Karen L. Panter, Steven E. Newman and Michael J. Roll

Catharanthus roseus plants were grown in three media, each containing one of two by-products of shredded waste tires. The media were no. 1) 1 rubber*: 1 peat moss, no. 2) 1 rubber*: 1 vermiculite: 2 peat moss, and no. 3) 2 rubber*: 1 vermiculite: 1 peat moss (by volume) where rubber* indicates either 0.6 cm shredded rubber or a fibrous by-product. Control plants were grown in 1 peatmoss: 1 rockwool and 1 vermiculite: 1 peatmoss (by volume). Catharanthus roseus cv. Peppermint Cooler plants were grown for 7 weeks in 10-cm containers at a commercial Denver-area greenhouse. Data taken included plant heights, plant widths, flowers per stem, and dry weights. Visually, plants grown in the no. 2 mix, with either fiber or 0.6-cm rubber, were similar to the controls and superior to the other two mixes. Ending plant heights were similar among the two controls and no. 2 with fiber and were taller than all other combinations. Flower numbers were greater in the 1 rockwool: 1 peat moss control and no. 2 mix with fiber than any other treatment. The same was true for stem number and dry weight. Results indicate that the no. 2 mix of 1 fiber: 1 vermiculite: 2 peatmoss has potential for container crop production.

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Karen L. Panter, Amy M. Briggs, Michael J. Roll and Steven E. Newman

The objective of this study was to determine which combination of three types of irrigation systems, three fertilization method, and four growing media produced optimum growth of flowering vinca, Catharanthus roseus. Irrigation systems used included ebb-and-fl ood, drip, and pulse; fertilization methods included slow release, prepackaged, and custom mixed; and the four growing media were peatmoss:perlite:vermiculite (1:1:1, by volume), peatmoss:rockwool (1:1, by volume), and 0.6-cm diameter shredded rubber or fabric from waste tires: vermiculite:peatmoss (1:1:2, by volume). Four replications of five plants each were used in each of the 36 treatment combinations. Plants were potted 29 and 30 May 1996 in 10-cm containers, grown for 10 weeks, and harvested 6 Aug. 1996. The drip-irrigated benches were irrigated once per day for 15 s. Pulse-irrigated benches were watered twice per day for 6 s. This resulted in the drip- and pulse-irrigated plants receiving a similar volume of water daily. Ebb-and-fl ood benches were filled once per day with drainage occurring 15 min after filling. Ending plant heights and dry weights indicated that those plants in the prepackaged fertilizer/drip or ebb-and-fl ood irrigation/shredded tire fiber growing medium were comparable to plants grown in the peatmoss:rockwool medium with the same fertilizer and irrigation methods.

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Karen L. Panter, Steven E. Newman, Amy M. Briggs and Michael J. Roll

Three application rates of two new growing medium surfactants were tested under two different irrigation systems on Dianthus barbatus plants. The objectives of the study were to determine if either of the surfactants influenced plant growth and development and to determine if surfactant applications decreased irrigation frequencies. The three levels of surfactant tested were 0 mg·L–1 (control), 10 mg·L–1 applied at each watering, and 100 mg·L–1 applied once a week. Each surfactant and rate was tested on hand-watered and ebb-and-flood irrigated plants. D. barbatus plants were grown for 8 weeks in 875-ml (12.7 cm) pots. Plants were watered when at least one plant per treatment showed visible wilt. Results showed that phytotoxicity symptoms occurred with repeated applications of both surfactants tested, especially at the 10 mg·L–1 rate at each watering. Application of either surfactant at 10 mg·L–1 at each watering decreased plant heights, dry weights, and plant widths, and increased phytotoxicity symptoms over the controls and the 100 mg·L–1 weekly treatments. Fewer waterings were required in surfactant-treated containers.

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Steven E. Newman, Karen L. Panter, Michael J. Roll and Robert O. Miller

Two cultivars of zonal geraniums (Pelargonium ×hortorum Bailey), `Danielle' and `Kim', were grown in media containing three grind sizes of rubber (2.4, 6, or 10 mm) and fiber from the fabric belting processed from waste tires in three proportions: 1 rubber or fiber: 1 peat; 1 rubber or fiber: 1 vermiculite: 2 peat; and 2 rubber or fiber: 1 vermiculite: 1 peat (by volume). Two control media were also included: 1 vermiculite: 1 peat, and 1 rockwool: 1 peat (by volume). Geranium plants were grown in media containing up to 25% waste tire products along with traditional medium components without reducing plant quality. Plant growth was best and flower count was highest in the vermiculite and peat medium, plants were smallest and flower count was lowest in media containing the rubber grinds at 2.4 or 6 mm, making up 50% of the media. The medium 1 rubber: 1 vermiculite: 2 peat, regardless of grind or fiber, produced plants equal to the rockwool and peat moss medium. All plants grown in media containing rubber by-products had elevated Zn and Cu in the foliage; however, Zn and Cu were highest in media containing 50% rubber. Foliar P: Zn ratios were less for plants grown in media containing 50% rubber and also were lower in plants grown in media with smaller rubber grind sizes.