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Shengrui Yao, Ian A. Merwin and Michael G. Brown

Minirhizotrons were employed to study new root occurrence, turnover, and depth distribution of apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) rootstocks under four groundcover management systems (GMS): preemergence herbicide (Pre-H), postemergence herbicide (Post-H), mowed sod (Grass) and hardwood bark mulch (Mulch) that have been maintained since 1992 in an orchard near Ithaca, NY. Two root observation tubes were installed on both sides of one tree in three replicates for each GMS treatment. Root observations were taken at 2–3 week intervals during growing seasons of 2002 and 2003. Tree growth and yield data were collected annually since 1992. The Mulch and Post-H treatments had bigger trees and higher yields than other treatments; whereas the Grass treatment had the smallest trees and lowest yields. Higher number of new roots was observed in a light crop year (2002) than a heavy crop year (2003). Mulch trees had more shallow roots and Grass trees had fewer total roots than other treatments. Root diameter was positively correlated with overwintering root survival. The Pre-H GMS had higher root mortality during a hot and dry growing season (2002). GMS treatments affected root number and root depth distribution patterns. Hot and dry weather conditions and crop load reduced new root emergence, increased root mortality and reduced root median lifespan. GMS treatments together with environmental factors affected root growth, turnover and distribution.

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Shengrui Yao, Ian A. Merwin and Michael G. Brown

Root observations in situ with a rhizotron camera enabled us to compare the performance of apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) trees on 3 rootstock clones planted in a New York orchard with a history of apple replant disease. Visual observations were conducted in situ at monthly intervals during 2 growing seasons through minirhizotron tubes for trees grafted onto 3 rootstocks: M.7 (M.7), Geneva 30 (G.30), and Cornell-Geneva 6210 (CG.6210). There were 3 preplant soil treatments (fumigation, compost amendment, and untreated checks) and 2 tree planting positions (within the old tree rows or in the old grass lanes of the previous orchard at this site). Preplant soil treatments and old-row versus grass-lane tree planting positions had no apparent influence on root systems, whereas rootstock clones substantially influenced root growth and demography. New root emergence was suppressed during the first fruit-bearing year (2004) on all 3 rootstock clones compared with the previous nonbearing year (2003). A root-growth peak in early July accounted for more than 50% of all new roots in 2003, but there was no midsummer root-growth peak in 2004. The median lifespan for roots of CG.6210 was twice that of G.30 and M.7 in 2004. Also, CG.6210 had more roots below 30 cm depth, whereas M.7 had more roots from 11 to 20 cm depth. Trees on CG.6210 were bigger, yielded more fruit, and had the highest yield efficiency in the third year after planting compared with trees on G.30 and M.7 rootstocks. Crop load appeared to inhibit new root development and changed root-growth dynamics during the first bearing year, with a resurgence in new root growth after fruit was harvested in October 2004. Rootstock genotype was the dominant influence on root lifespan and distribution in this study, whereas preplant soil fumigation, compost amendments, and replanting positions had little apparent impact on root characteristics despite their influence on above-ground tree growth and yield.

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Shengrui Yao, Ian A. Merwin and Michael G. Brown

Minirhizotrons were used to study root emergence, turnover, and depth distribution of apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) rootstocks (M.9/MM.111) under four groundcover management systems (GMSs)—pre-emergence herbicide (Pre-H), postemergence herbicide (Post-H), mowed sod grass (Grass), and hardwood bark mulch (Mulch)—that had been maintained since 1992 in an orchard near Ithaca, NY. Two root observation tubes were installed on both sides of one tree in three replicates for each GMS treatment. Roots were observed by camera at 2- to 3-weekly intervals during the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 and from whole tree excavations in Apr. 2000. Tree growth and yield observations from 1992 to 2003 showed that Mulch and Post-H treatments produced more tree growth and higher yields than other treatments during most years; the Grass treatment usually had the smallest trees and lowest yields. More root emergence was observed in a light crop year (2002) than in a heavy crop year (2003). Pre-H treatment trees had more total roots and new roots than all other treatments, and trees in Grass plots had fewer total roots than others. Trees in Mulch plots had more shallow roots, and trees in Grass plots had more deep roots than others. Root diameter was positively correlated with overwintering root survival. The Pre-H treatment trees had greater root mortality than other trees during an unusually hot and dry growing season (2002) and this was attributed to higher shallow soil temperatures in this treatment. The GMS treatments affected root number and root depth distribution patterns. Despite microsprinkler irrigation, hot, dry weather conditions coincided with decreased root growth, increased root mortality, and reduced root median lifespan. GMS treatments affected root growth, turnover, and distribution at this orchard, and these differences were linked with long-term trends in tree growth and fruit production in this study.

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Amaya Atucha, Ian A. Merwin and Michael G. Brown

Groundcover management systems (GMSs) are essential for fruit production, but very few long-term studies have evaluated orchard GMS sustainability. We evaluated four GMSs—pre-emergence soil-active herbicides (PreHerb), post-emergence herbicide (PostHerb), a turfgrass cover crop (Sod), and hardwood bark mulch (Mulch)—in an apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) orchard over 16 years of continuous observation. There were no consistent long-term trends in fruit yields among GMSs, although during the first 5 years, yields were lower in trees on Sod. Tree growth was greater in PostHerb and Mulch than in Sod during the first 5 years, and during the next decade, trees in Mulch plots were consistently larger than in other GMSs. Total soil nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) content, C-to-N ratios, and essential plant nutrients were much greater in the Mulch soil after 16 years of treatments. Long-term responses of trees to groundcover vegetation indicated that apple trees respond adaptively to compensate for weed and grass competition. Year-round elimination of surface vegetation with residual soil active herbicides may be unnecessary or even detrimental for orchard productivity and soil fertility in established orchards. Post-emergence herbicides that reduce weed competition primarily during the summer months may offer an optimal combination of weed suppression and soil conservation.

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Shengrui Yao, Ian A. Merwin and Michael G. Brown

Rhizotron observations enabled us to compare the performance of three apple (Malu ×domestica) rootstock clones following different pre-plant soil treatments in an apple replant study at Ithaca, NY. Trees were planted in Nov. 2001, with one minirhizotron tube per tree in three replicate plots of three rootstocks (M7, CG30, and CG6210), three pre-plant soil treatments (fumigation, compost amendment, and untreated controls), and two planting positions (within the old tree rows, or in the old grass lanes). Monthly root observations were conducted during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons. There were substantially fewer new roots observed in the first bearing year (2004) than the previous nonbearing year (2003), for all three rootstocks. A root-growth peak in early July accounted for more than 50% of all new roots in 2003, but there was no midsummer root growth peak in 2004. Neither pre-plant soil treatments nor old row or grass-lane planting positions had much influence on root growth. The median lifespan for roots of CG6210 was twice as long as that of CG30 and M7 in 2004. Also, CG6210 had more roots below 30-cm depth, while M7 had more roots from 11–20 cm. Trees grafted on CG6210 were bigger and yielded more fruit in the third year after planting, compared with trees on CG30 and M7 rootstocks. Crop load severely inhibited new root development and changed root-growth dynamics during the first cropping year, with a surge in root growth after fruit harvest in Oct. 2004. Rootstock genotype was the dominant influence on root lifespan and distribution, compared with pre-plant soil fumigation, compost amendments, or replanting positions within the previous orchard rows or grass lanes.

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Gregory M. Peck, Ian A. Merwin, Michael G. Brown and Arthur M. Agnello

A systems-based approach was used to evaluate integrated (IFP) and organic fruit production (OFP) (during and after the transition period) in an established high-density commercial orchard of disease-resistant ‘Liberty’ apples (Malus ×domestica Borkh.). Agroecological and economic evaluations included: yields, tree growth, leaf nutrient levels, arthropod and cosmetic fruit damage, environmental impacts, variable costs of production, and potential crop value using both direct market and wholesale market prices. Cumulative yields (2004–2007) of both harvested and total (harvested + dropped) fruit were not different between the two systems. Tree size (trunk cross-sectional area) was not consistently different between the production systems. The IFP-grown apples had between 3% and 6% insect damage (within normal percentages for this region) and between 3% and 17% total damage (either internal or cosmetic). The OFP-grown apples had between 3% and 25% insect damage and 3% to 75% total damage, varying greatly from year to year. In 2006, superficial blemishes, caused by diseases and scarfskin, were extensive on OFP-grown fruit. Using the Environmental Impact Quotient, the potential negative environmental impacts were estimated to be six times greater in the OFP system, largely as a result of the use of lime sulfur and fish oil for thinning and the large quantity of kaolin clay used for pest control. Partial budgets of both systems estimated variable production expenses to be 9% greater for OFP. Sales value was estimated to be 6% greater for OFP than IFP using direct market prices (e.g., farm stand or farmers' market) and 11% greater for IFP than OFP using wholesale market prices. A 56% premium was used to calculate the OFP crop value in the third and fourth years (fruit could have been sold with an organic label after 36 months from the last organically prohibited material). Four years of evaluation suggested that IFP could be widely implemented in the northeastern United States, but the lack of market incentives might impede its adoption. Producing disease-resistant apples under an OFP system also showed potential for success, but a price premium would be needed to offset the reduced profitability incurred from arthropod pests, poor fruit finish, and small fruit size.

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Amaya Atucha, Ian A. Merwin, Chandra K. Purohit and Michael G. Brown

Excessive nitrogen (N) applications can increase surface and water contamination, and leaching losses may occur when N fertilizer rates are too high relative to crop demands and soil N availability. Quantifying nutrient inputs, cycling, and outputs from orchards provides a method to measure surplus of nutrients, particularly N, that may leach or runoff. We conducted a long-term study to develop N budgets based on observed nutrient dynamics under four groundcover management systems (GMSs) with and without N fertilization. Four GMS treatments were randomly assigned to 12 plots and maintained since 1992 in 2-m-wide strips within tree rows: pre-emergence residual herbicide (PreHerb), post-emergence herbicide (PostHerb), mowed-sod (Sod), and hardwood bark mulch (Mulch). We measured system N inputs in fertilizer, mulch biomass, rain, and irrigation water; N outputs in harvested fruit, surface runoff, and subsurface leaching; and internal N cycling from surface vegetation, soil mineralization, leaf fall, and pruned wood. For the year with N fertilizer (2005), the overall N balance was positive (inputs exceeded outputs) in all GMSs but greater in the PostHerb and Mulch treatments. In the year without N fertilizer (2007), the overall N balance was negative for PreHerb and PostHerb and positive for Mulch and Sod treatments. Soil mineralization and recycling groundcover biomass accounted for greater than 60% of internal N fluxes, and harvested fruit represented greater than 70% of N outputs from the system during both years. During the year with N fertilizer, N losses were 1% to 4% and 18% to 22% through surface runoff and subsurface leaching, respectively. During the year without fertilizer, surface runoff N losses were twice the subsurface leaching N losses in all GMSs.

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Adam D. Karl, Ian A. Merwin, Michael G. Brown, Rebecca A. Hervieux and Justine E. Vanden Heuvel

Four under-vine management treatments were established in 2011 in a Vitis vinifera L. ‘Cabernet Franc’ vineyard in the Finger Lakes region of New York: cultivation (CULT), native vegetation (NV), white clover Trifolium repens L. (WC), and glyphosate herbicide (GLY) as the control. Previously installed drainage lysimeters were used to monitor nutrient and pesticide concentrations in leachate water samples. Differences in the physical structure of soils among treatments were only observed in the 4th year of the study when the top 6 cm of CULT soils had greater bulk density than the other treatments, and less porosity and available water capacity than WC soils. WC soils had 17% greater organic matter than CULT soils, and 46% greater aggregate stability than GLY soils. Soil microbial respiration was generally greater in NV and WC treatments than GLY and CULT. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leachate concentrations were greater in GLY and CULT compared with NV and WC, having annual mean DOC leachate concentrations as much as 36% greater than the cover crop samples. Mean annual total nitrogen (TN) leachate concentrations of CULT and NV were less than GLY and WC samples by as much as 86%. In 2012, GLY soils leached greater concentrations of imidacloprid insecticide and more imidacloprid metabolites than the other three treatments, with the proportion of samples testing positive for measurable concentrations of imidacloprid or imidacloprid metabolites at least five times greater in GLY than the other treatments. Cumulatively, these factors demonstrate the potential of under-vine cover crops to maintain soil quality and decrease the leaching of nutrients and agrochemicals in vineyards in comparison with conventional practices.