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  • Author or Editor: Mary M. Gachukia x
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Ten substrates were formulated by blending perlite or parboiled fresh rice hulls (PBH) to produce root substrates (substrates) that contained either 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, or 60% (by volume) perlite or PBH, with the remainder being sphagnum peatmoss. All substrates containing PBH had higher total pore space than substrates containing an equivalent amount of perlite. As the percentage perlite increased from 20% to 60%, the total pore space decreased. The total pore space increased as the amount of PBH increased to 50% and then decreased as the amount of PBH increased from 50% to 60%. The air-filled pore space was not different between substrates containing 20% perlite or PBH. However, the air-filled pore space was higher in PBH-containing substrates than in equivalent perlite-containing substrates when the amount of PBH or perlite was at least 40%. As the amount of perlite or PBH was increased, the air-filled pore space increased, but the rate of increase was higher for PBH-containing substrates. The 20% PBH-containing substrate had a higher water-holding capacity than the 20% perlite-containing substrate. However, at 30% or higher PBH, the PBH-containing root substrates had a lower water-holding capacity than equivalent perlite-containing substrates. As the percentage perlite or PBH was increased, the water-holding capacity decreased, but at a higher rate in PBH-containing substrates than in perlite-containing substrates. For all substrates except those containing 40% PBH or perlite, substrates containing PBH had lower bulk densities than equivalent perlite-containing substrates. The differences in bulk densities were not great enough to be of practical significance. Inclusion of PBH in the substrate provided for drainage and air-filled pore space as did perlite. However, less PBH would be required in a substrate to provide the same air-filled pore space as perlite when more than 20% perlite or PBH is used.

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Substrates were formulated by blending parboiled fresh rice (Oryza sativa) hulls (PBH) or perlite with sphagnum peat (peat) to produce root substrates (substrates) that contained 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, or 60% (by volume) PBH or perlite with the remainder being peat. After 0 (initial mixing), 4, or 8 weeks in a greenhouse environment, samples were taken and pH, electrical conductivity (EC), nitrate (NO3 ), ammonium (NH4 +), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were determined. As the amount of PBH or perlite in the substrate was increased, the pH increased. After 0 and 8 weeks, the pH of substrates containing up to 30% PBH or perlite had a similar pH. However, the rate of pH increase at these sampling times was higher than that of perlite so that substrates containing 40% or more PBH had a higher pH than equivalent perlite-containing substrates. At the week 4 sampling period, all substrates containing PBH had a higher pH than equivalent perlite-containing substrates. For all sampling times, the difference in pH between equivalent PBH and perlite-containing substrates was not high enough to be of practical significance. For all sampling times, EC increased as the amount of perlite was increased. Depending upon sampling time, the EC decreased or remained unchanged as the amount of PBH was increased. For all sampling times and substrates, EC was within acceptable ranges for unused substrates. Substrates containing PBH had higher NO3 levels than equivalent perlite-containing substrates. The NH4 + level of the substrates decreased as the amount of PBH or perlite was increased. The levels of NO3 and NH4 + were within acceptable ranges for unused substrates. Substrate P and K increased as the amount of PBH in the substrate was increased, but the concentration of P and K remained unchanged or decreased as the amount of perlite was increased. None of the differences between equivalent PBH and perlite-containing substrates was high enough to be problematic with respect to crop production and all of the chemical parameters were within acceptable ranges for unused root substrates.

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Substrates were formulated by blending parboiled fresh rice (Oryza sativa) hulls (PBH) or perlite with sphagnum peat (peat) to produce root substrates (substrates) that contained 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, or 60% (by volume) PBH or perlite with the remainder being peat. After 0, 4, or 8 weeks in a greenhouse environment, samples were taken and calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sulfur (S), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and boron (B) were determined. At all sampling times, substrates containing PBH had higher Ca concentrations than perlite-containing substrates. At all sampling times, Ca concentration decreased as the amount of perlite or PBH was increased, but the Ca concentration decreased at a higher rate in perlite-containing substrates than in PBH-containing substrates. After 0 weeks, perlite-containing substrates had higher Mg concentrations than equivalent PBH-containing substrates, but the opposite was true after 4 weeks. After 8 weeks, perlite- and PBH-containing substrates had similar concentrations of Mg. At all times, Mg concentration decreased as the amount of perlite or PBH was increased. Perlite substrates had higher concentrations of Fe than equivalent PBH substrates, and as the amount of perlite or PBH was increased, the amount of Fe decreased. PBH-containing substrates had higher concentrations of Mn than equivalent perlite-containing substrates, and as the amount of PBH was increased, the amount of Mn increased. Cu concentrations were significantly affected by sampling time, but at all sampling times, PBH-containing substrates had similar or higher Cu concentrations than equivalent perlite-containing substrates. Perlite substrates had higher concentrations of Zn than equivalent PBH substrates, and as the amount of perlite was increased, the amount of Zn increased. S and B were not significantly affected by substrate component or time. Secondary macro- and microelement concentrations of all substrates were within recommended levels for greenhouse crops except for Mn. Mn concentrations were within recommended ranges at up to 50% PBH. In most cases, PBH would be used at levels lower than 50%, but in cases where more than 50% PBH were used in the substrate, proper pH management may be important to prevent excessive Mn availability.

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