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  • Author or Editor: Martin M. Meyer Jr. x
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Abstract

Plants were initiated from florets of Hosta sieboldiana (Lodd.) Engler cultivars cultured on a modified Murashige-Skoog medium containing 0.5 – 2.5 mg/liter naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 – 2.5 mg/liter 6-benzylamino purine (BA) and grown in the light. These plants could be separated and proliferated on a similar medium to give large numbers of plants. Plant propagated from ‘Frances Williams’ had a chimeral separation into green and gold sports as well as retaining the chimeral organization.

Open Access

Abstract

Seeds of C. apiculatus and C. divaricatus were treated with concentrated H2SO4, washed, and stored in moist vermiculite at 2°C (stratified) for 0, 30, 58, 87, and 116 days. These seeds were then tested for germination at 4.5, 10.0, 15.5, 21.0, and 26.5°. The percentage of seed that germinated was influenced by an interaction of duration of stratification and germination temperature. Seeds of these species germinated at a widening range of temperatures as length of moist chilling increased and thus, demonstrated the postdormant phenomenon.

Open Access

Abstract

Flower pedicels and ovary bases of 4 cultivars of Rhododendron catawbiense Michx. were cultured in vitro and proliferated granular masses of tissue on Anderson's medium containing indoleacetic acid (IAA) 1.0 or 4.0 mg/liter and 6(γ,γ-dimethylal-lylamino)-purine (2iP) 5.0 or 15.0 mg/liter. These masses formed numerous shoots when cultured on Anderson's medium with lower levels of growth regulators. The shoots were rooted and grown as plants which appeared normal in vegetative characteristics.

Open Access

Abstract

Illinois with over 11 million people (83% urban) is the population leader and leading consumer of environmental plants in the Midwest. Illinois' considerable wealth is derived from a diversified industrial and agricultural base of which environmental horticulture plays an important role. The Illinois Department of Agriculture Bureau of Plant and Apiary Protection lists over 900 certified plant nurseries with about 10,000 ha in production and over 2500 certified dealers in nursery stock. The production nurseries are widely distributed but tend to cluster around highly populated areas (see map). Many of the nurseries range in size from 0.1 to 10 ha and grow and sell for local consumption, but several are retail and wholesale establishments of 100-500 ha and sell nationally as well as locally. Illinois requires diverse landscape plant materials for its 384 miles from Wisconsin to Kentucky. This large geographic area results in a diversity of climate and soil types which means specialty crops do well in certain areas.

Open Access

Abstract

terile rooms or reach-in boxes were used to prevent contamination of cultures in early work with plant tissue and embryo culture. The new sterile hoods, which are a spinoff of the aerospace program (2), make continuous work at transferring tissue cultures comfortable and reduce contamination. The laminar flow hood, evaluated by Coriell and McGarrity (1), is particularly comfortable and effective. These hoods are large, heavy, and expensive pieces of equipment and not entirely suitable for protoplast manipulation and other microscope work. This report will describe a sterile hood, which can be built easily with readily obtainable components and has advantages over many of the available commercial units. The laminar flow hood described is reasonably portable and minimizes vibration of the work surface, making it ideal for microscope work.

Open Access

Abstract

In the article “Semiportable Laminar Flow Hood for Tissue Culture and Microscope Use for Research and Teaching” by Martin M. Meyer, Jr. (HortScience 21:1064–1065, Aug. 1986), the first sentence of the article should read “Sterile rooms or reachin boxes were used to prevent contamination of cultures in early work with plant tissue and embryo culture.”

Open Access

Abstract

The influence of P applications on the growth of Berberis x mentorensis L. M. Ames, Juniperus chinensis ‘Keteleeri’ Cornman, and Taxus x media ‘Hicksii’ Rehd., was studied for 2 growing seasons. During one summer P was applied at varying rates to plants grown in containers and the growth and P content of various plant parts were determined. The following spring the roots of these dormant plants were washed free of the growing medium and the plants were grown in solution culture at varying levels of P labeled with P32. The spring growth, the P content of all plant parts, and the % P coming from the solution into all plant parts during the spring were determined. Phosphorus applied during the summer caused little growth response except with young Taxus plants receiving a high P level. There were several significant growth responses during the spring due to P applications the previous season. A high P concentration during the spring increased the growth of some plants, but Taxus plants with a high internal P status showed little response. The P coming into the new spring growth from solution varied from 0 to 86% depending on the plant species used and the concentration around the roots. In Berberis the majority of the rest of the P moving into new growth originated from reserve P in the roots. In Juniperus the majority of the internally redistributed P came from the foliage and in Taxus both the foliage and roots were important sources of reserve P.

Open Access

Abstract

Horseradish (Armoracia lapathifolia Gilib. Cruciferae) is one of the few horticultural crops propagated as true root cuttings. This perpetuates many viruses and root borne diseases causing yield reductions (2) as growers take propagation material from production fields. Multiplication of new and virus-free cultivars takes time by root cuttings and stock is subject to reinfection from existing cultivars and other members of the Cruciferae. Wurm (3) found the hypocotyl and stem of seedlings of horse-radish would form adventitious shoots. We have found that whole leaf cuttings of horseradish develop roots under mist and subsequently generate shoots from the base of the petiole. However, while small pieces of leaf blade die before generating plants under mist, these pieces can produce plants under sterile conditions by in vitro techniques as follows:

Open Access

Abstract

Two clones of natural hybrids Acer × freemanii were propagated as scions and cuttings from trees 55-60 years old. Shoot tips from propagules were disinfected and cultured on a modified Linsmeier-Skoog (LS) medium in vitro. Elongation of shoots, rooting, and callus formation at the shoot base were dependent on the concentration of growth regulator used. The lower well-developed nodes of the typical cultured shoots could be separated and cultured individually to obtain a slow increase in propagules. When shoot tips were transferred to a medium with 0.01-0.05 μM N-phenyl-N'-l,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea (thidiazuron), shoot proliferation was initiated, which could be separated into 3-10 new shoots at 6-week intervals for further proliferation or rooting. Rooted shoots were transferred to the greenhouse for further growth and subsequent transfer to the field.

Open Access

Abstract

Methanolic extracts from leaves, young stems, and old stems of five Acer (maple) spp. were tested for their effects on adventitious root initiation in mung bean (Vigna radiata Wilcox’) cuttings. An extract from the leaves of A. ginnala strongly stimulated root initiation, and the active compounds in this fraction were not synergistic with IAA. This extract was more stimulatory than IAA on mung bean cuttings and stimulated root initiation in softwood cuttings of A. saccharinum and A. griseum. Preliminary characterization of this extract indicates that it is a phenolic compound and/or a weak acid. Chemical name used: 1H-indoIe-3-acetic acid (IAA).

Open Access