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Marci Spaw and Kimberly A. Williams

This decision case presents the issues a grower would face when deciding where to place and how to orient a high tunnel structure on a specific farm site. It provides a tool to teach site planning concepts on a small scale that are easily transferable to issues addressed when planning for construction of all sizes and types of protected-environment structures. In this case, the owner of Full Moon Farm must decide the placement of her high tunnels on a given farm site. Factors to consider include wind, snow, and ice loads as well as structural integrity, labor efficiency, and optimizing light levels. Ultimately, no one solution meets all recommended criteria, so the grower must prioritize the importance of various factors to come to a decision. This case study is intended for use in upper-level undergraduate horticulture courses, and although the principles are broadly applicable to site planning across geographic regions, it is most appropriate for climates above lat. 35°N. In particular, it may prove useful in courses such as greenhouse management and production courses for vegetables, cut flowers, and small fruits, where students assume the role of grower/farmer in the site planning process. This case study is supported by a website version with digital images, digital video, and maps that can be used both inside and outside of the classroom; all are downloadable from the website http://www.hightunnels.org/planningcasestudy.htm. The teaching notes present an unorthodox solution to the Full Moon Farm site planning dilemma.

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Marci Spaw*, Kimberly A. Williams and Laura A. Brannon

This study compared student learning outcomes of two teaching methodologies: a summary lecture and an asynchronous web-based method that included a case study (www.hightunnels.org/planningcasestudy.htm) followed by an all-class discussion. Twenty-one students taking an upper-level undergraduate course in greenhouse management were randomly split into two groups. Each group experienced both methodologies with presentations designed to provide complimentary information about site planning for protected environment structures; however, the order in which the groups received the methods was reversed. After each presentation, the participants were given an identical quiz (Time 1 and Time 2) comprised of questions that assessed knowledge gained, higher-order learning, and their perception of how confident they would be in solving actual site planning scenarios. Though quiz scores were not different between the two groups after Time 1 or 2, overall quiz scores improved after Time 2 for both groups combined (P = 0.03). When questions were categorized as lower-order vs. higher-order learning, a greater increase in scores was observed in higher-order learning (P = 0.12 vs. P = 0.04, respectively). Although students' perceived confidence was not influenced by which method was received first (P = 0.23), their confidence increased after Time 2 compared to Time 1 (P = 0.07). Rather than one teaching method being superior to the other, this study suggests that it is beneficial to use both. Interestingly, while students overwhelmingly preferred to receive the summary lecture before the web-based method, there was no significant difference in test scores between the two orders, suggesting that neither order offered any advantage.

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Marci Spaw, Kimberly A. Williams*, Ingrid L. Mallberg, Laurie Hodges and Ellen T. Paparozzi

Case studies promote the development of problem-solving skills, but few have been created for horticulture and related curricula. This web-based decision case presents the challenge of determining the cause of symptoms of foliar chlorosis in a crop of cut Dicentra spectabilis while forcing it for Valentine's Day sales. It provides a tool to promote the development of diagnostic skills for production dilemmas, including nutritional disorders, disease and insect problems, and evaluation of the appropriateness of cultural practices. Cut Dicentra is a minor crop and standard production practices are not well established. Therefore, solving this case requires that students research production protocol as well as nutritional and pest problems to develop a solution. In this case study, which is supported by an image-rich web-based version at www.hightunnels.org/cutflowercasestudy.htm, a grower at Flint's Flower Farm must determine the cause of foliar chlorosis that is slowly appearing on about half of the plants of her cut Dicentra crop. The condition could be related to a number of possible problems including a nutritional disorder, insect attack, disease infection, or production practices. Some resources are provided to aid students in gathering background information. Data accumulated by the grower is presented to allow students to logically eliminate unlikely solutions and predict (a) probable cause(s). The solution, which is rather unique to this crop, is provided. This case study is intended for use in upper-level undergraduate courses of floriculture production, nutrient management, plant pathology, and entomology.

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Marci Spaw, Kimberly A. Williams, Laurie Hodges, Ellen T. Paparozzi and Ingrid L. Mallberg

This universally accessible, Web-based decision case presents the challenge of determining the cause of foliar chlorosis in a crop of dicentra (Dicentra spectabilis) being forced as a cut flower for Valentine's Day sales. The case study serves as a tool to promote the development of diagnostic skills for production dilemmas, including nutritional disorders, disease problems, and evaluation of the appropriateness of cultural practices. Cut dicentra is a minor crop and standard production practices are not well established. Solving this case requires that students research production protocol, as well as nutritional and pest problems, and determine whether they have enough information to recommend a solution. In this case study, a grower at Flint's Flower Farm must determine the cause of foliar chlorosis that is slowly appearing on about half the plants of her cut dicentra crop. The condition could be related to a number of possible problems, including a nutritional disorder, disease infection, or production practices. Resources are provided to aid students in gathering background information. Data accumulated by the grower are presented to allow students to eliminate unlikely solutions logically. The solution, which is unique to this crop, is provided along with detailed objectives and discussion points in teaching notes. This case study is complex in nature and is intended for use with advanced students in upper-level undergraduate courses of floriculture production, nutrient management, and plant pathology who have been previously exposed to the diagnostic process.