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  • Author or Editor: M.S. Mehlenbacher x
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A survey of hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) genotypes for response to the eastern filbert blight pathogen [Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller] was performed. Seven varieties were discovered that did not display disease signs or symptoms when subjected to severe inoculation with A. anomala in the greenhouse and assayed for infection. These cultivars are `Closca Molla', `Ratoli', `Yoder #5', `Potomac', `Medium Long', `Grand Traverse' and `Zimmerman'. `Ratoli' and `Closca Molla', both minor varieties from Spain, are superior agronomic types to the resistant cultivar Gasaway, which has been the main resistance source used in the breeding program. Only `Zimmerman' carries the RAPD marker linked to resistance in populations segregating for the `Gasaway' gene. Three populations were created using, `Zimmerman', as the pollen parent in controlled crosses. These populations were inoculated with spores of the pathogen and assayed by indirect ELISA and by observation of canker incidence. Resistant phenotypes make up 84% of the populations, indicating that `Zimmerman' possesses resistance either distinct from or additional to that found in, `Gasaway'. A RAPD marker linked to the resistance gene in crosses with `Gasaway' cosegregates with the resistant phenotype in all three populations (0 cM, 3 cM, 4 cM). Mechanisms to explain the distortion in these populations are discussed. Further studies are required to characterize the mechanism and inheritance resistance in these other clones.

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Oil content, fatty acid and vitamin E composition of seventeen varieties of hazelnuts, thirteen types of nuts, and seven different oil seeds were determined as part of a larger study on Hazelnut kernel quality. Alpha-tocopherol was the predominant (90%) tocopherol in all hazelnut varieties. In other nuts α- and Γ-tocopherols were predominant Delta-tocopherol was found in some kinds of nuts but it was not found in hazelnuts. All four kinds of tocopherols were found in oil seeds and tocotrienols were found in some. Hazelnuts are a rich source of α-tocopherol. Oil concentration varied among hazelnut cultivars and ranged from a low of 57.9% in Hall's Giant to 67% in Tombul. Macadamias were the highest in oil content (76.9%). Oleic acid and linoleic acid comprised more than 90% of the fatty acid composition in most nuts.

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Eastern filbert blight (EFB), caused by the fungus Anisogramma anomala, is a primary limitation to european hazelnut (Corylus avellana) cultivation in eastern North America. American hazelnut (Corylus americana) is the endemic host of A. anomala and, despite its tiny, thick-shelled nuts, is a potentially valuable source of EFB resistance and climatic adaptation. Interspecific hybrids (Corylus americana × C. avellana) have been explored for nearly a century as a means to combine EFB resistance with wider adaptability and larger nuts. Although significant progress was made in the past, the genetic diversity of the starting material was limited and additional improvements are needed for expansion of hazelnut (Corylus sp.) production outside of Oregon, where 99% of the U.S. crop is currently produced. Our objective was to determine if C. americana can be a donor of EFB resistance. We crossed 29 diverse EFB-resistant C. americana accessions to EFB-susceptible C. avellana selections (31 total progenies) to produce 2031 F1 plants. In addition, new C. americana germplasm was procured from across the native range of the species. The new collection of 1335 plants from 122 seed lots represents 72 counties and 22 states. The interspecific hybrid progenies and a subset of the American collection (616 trees from 62 seed lots) were field planted and evaluated for EFB response following field inoculations and natural disease spread over seven growing seasons. EFB was rated on a scale of 0 (no EFB) to 5 (all stems containing cankers). Results showed that progeny means of the interspecific hybrids ranged from 0.96 to 4.72. Fourteen of the 31 progenies were composed of at least one-third EFB-free or highly tolerant offspring (i.e., ratings 0–2), transmitting a significant level of resistance/tolerance. Several corresponding C. americana accessions that imparted a greater degree of resistance to their hybrid offspring were also identified. In addition, results showed that 587 (95.3%) of the 616 C. americana plants evaluated remained completely free of EFB. These findings confirm reports that the species rarely expresses signs or symptoms of the disease and should be robustly studied and exploited in breeding.

Open Access

Abstract

‘McShay’ is an attractive, excellent quality apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) with field immunity to apple scab. The fruit is similar in color, flavor, and texture to ‘McIntosh’. ‘McShay’ is named in honor of the late J. Ralph Shay and is a late fall dessert apple well-adapted to Oregon's Willamette Valley. ‘McShay’ is the ninth cultivar to be released by the cooperative apple breeding program of Indiana, Illinois, and New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Stations.

Open Access