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  • Author or Editor: M.J. Lareau x
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Plug or bare root strawberry plants were planted on raised beds with black plastic mulch from mid-June to early-August. The early plantings gave the most developped and productive plants but these required several derunnerings to avoid overcrowding. Due to the unavailability of runners, it was not possible to establish plug plants before mid-July. Field losses of dormant bare root plants were high for the July planting. The use of a perforated polyethylene rowcover from October to May increased yield and fruit size.

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From June to Sept. 1993, the day-neutral strawberry cultivar Tribute was subjected to two N fertilization rates (50 and 100 kg/ha), four K fertilization rates (0, 60, 120, and 180 kg/ha), and three Mg fertilization rates (0, 25, and 50 kg/ha) through trickle irrigation. The N and K treatments had no significant influence on yield and fruit size. The Mg treatments increased fruit size and did not affect yield.

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During 1993 and 1994, the day-neutral strawberry cultivar Tribute was subjected to two rates of N (50 and 100 kgha–1), four rates of K (0, 60,120, and 180 kgha–1), and three rates of Mg fertilization (0, 25, and 50 kgha–1) from June to September through trickle irrigation. The objective of this experiment was to determine the best N, K, and Mg fertilization rates in the production of day-neutral `Tribute' strawberry. The N treatments had no significant influence on yield and fruit size for the two years. We observed the same situation for K as for N. For Mg treatments, fruit size was increased by adding 25 kgha–1 during the first picking in 1993, and they had no effect in the second year. For both years, the Mg had no effect on the yield.

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Flower bud and leaf samples collected from a wide range of native North American Vaccinium populations were tested for the presence of blueberry shoestring virus (BBSSV) using the enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The highest disease incidence was found in Michigan (14%), although a few positive samples also were found in Virginia, New Jersey, Maine, Ontario, and Quebec. Of seven species tested, only V. corymbosum L. and V. angustifolium Ait. were infected with BBSSV.

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