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  • Author or Editor: M.D. Mullen x
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Abstract

Out of 38 lines of sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] which had demonstrated some resistance in laboratory tests to the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers), 13 lines had significant levels of resistance, based on weevil free yield in artificially infested fields in Yoakum, Texas. Two lines, W 125 and W 119, previously released as having weevil resistance, maintained a high level of resistance.

Open Access

Abstract

Six sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) breeding lines, W-71, W-115, W-119, W-125, W-149 and W-154, possessing moderate levels of resistance to the sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers), in combination with resistances to other released. They have dark orange flesh, relatively high yields and generally acceptable canning and baking qualities.

Open Access

`Silver Queen', `Incredible', and `Challenger' sweet corn (Zea mays L.) cultivars were evaluated at different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates at Springfield, Tenn., in 1993, 1994, and 1995. `Incredible' was more productive than `Silver Queen' and `Challenger'. Of the three cultivars, `Silver Queen' had the tallest plants, longest ears, and most attractive ears. Nitrogen fertilization rates were 0, 50, 100, and 150 (100 lb/acre at planting and 50 lb/acre sidedressed) lb/acre (0,56, 112, and 168 kg·ha-1). The 100 lb/acre rate of N applied at planting appeared to be sufficient for producing sweet corn in soils with an annual cropping frequency. Height of plants and ear diameters were larger at the higher fertilization rates, but differences among treatments were not great and were usually not significant. The cultivars of different genetic types did not differ in response to N fertilization rates. Cultivar × year interactions were significant for most factors evaluated, but most other interactions were not significant.

Full access

Abstract

The ‘Resisto’ sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.)Lam.] developed jointly by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, combines high yield and excellent baking and canning quality with resistances to disease and insect pests not available in present cultivars.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Regal’ sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was developed jointly by the USDA, the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. This cultivar has high yield and excellent baking flavor in combination with high levels of resistance to a wide array of diseases and insects.

Open Access

A survey of 140 processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fields in central California was conducted in 1996-97 to examine the relationship between K nutrition and fruit quality for processing. Quality parameters evaluated were soluble solids (SS), pH, color of a blended juice sample, and the percent of fruit affected by the color disorders yellow shoulder (YS) or internal white tissue (IWT). Juice color and pH were not correlated with soil K availability or plant K status. SS was correlated with both soil exchangeable K and midseason leaf K concentration (r = 0.25 and 0.28, p < 0.01) but the regression relationships suggested that the impact of soil or plant K status on fruit SS was minor. YS and IWT incidence, which varied among fields from 0% to 68% of fruit affected, was negatively correlated with K status of both soil and plant. Soil exchangeable K/√Mg ratio was the measure of soil K availability most closely correlated with percent total color disorders (YS + IWT, r = -0.45, p < 0.01). In field trials conducted to document the relationship between soil K availability and the fruit color disorders, soil application of either K or gypsum (CaSO4, to increase K/√Mg ratio) reduced YS and total color disorders. Multiple foliar K applications were effective in reducing fruit color disorders at only one of two sites. In no field trial did K application improve yield, SS, or juice color.

Free access