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  • Author or Editor: M. R. Becwar x
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Abstract

The winter survival of 10 pea cultivars of differing cold hardiness was studied under ground-level culture and on raised beds in moist semi-maritime conditions (CorvaUis, Oregon) and in more severe continental conditions (Weston, Oregon). There was survival in 7 cultivars at CorvaUis and 6 at Weston. Planting on raised beds at Corvallis significantly increased survival. This effect was consistent for all cultivars having appreciable survival rates. At Weston, the mean survival was higher on ground level plantings, but cultivars, responded differently to cultural systems. Of the 6 surviving cultivars, only the 2 least hardy had significantly higher survival on ground level plantings.

Open Access

Abstract

Injury to turfgrass leaf segments was measured as percent electrolyte leakage as affected by the duration and level of imposed heat stress. Species differences in heat tolerance were most apparent when injury was monitored over time at 50°C, using leaf segments which were obtained from heat-hardened plants and immersed in distilled water during the stress treatment. Quantitative differences in heat tolerance in vitro were consistent with qualitative descriptions of drought resistance for most of the species tested.

Open Access

Abstract

An accurate, rapid, and simple method of determining % moisture of cultivars of sweet corn (Zea mays L.) using a microwave oven is described. Working with corn in the moisture range of 65.5 to 72.4%, it was possible to obtain readings within ± 1% of those obtained with the standard 24-hour vacuum oven method.

Open Access

Abstract

Seedlings of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), red fescue (Festuca rubra L.), and weeping alkaligrass [Puccinellia distans (L.) Parl.] were exposed to water stress prior to measuring heat tolerance of leaf blade segments. Heat tolerance was determined using an electrolyte leakage assay. Water stress pretreatments did not increase in vitro heat tolerance of turfgrass leaves.

Open Access