Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: M. Peggy Damann x
Clear All Modify Search

To examine the effects of chilling and a limited inductive photoperiod (LIP) on flowering of Chrysanthemum superbum Bergmans ex J. Ingram `G. Marconi' and `Snow Lady', Coreopsis grandiflora Hogg `Sunray', and Coreopsis lanceolata L. `Early Sunrise', seeds were sown and plants were maintained in the greenhouse in short days (SDs) for 7 weeks, followed by 4 months of natural outdoor chilling for all plants except 10 of each cultivar, which remained in the greenhouse under SDs for the duration of the experiment. Upon return to greenhouse conditions, 10 plants of each cultivar were placed in SDs, all other chilled plants were placed in long-days (LDs) and subsequently transferred to SDs after receiving 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, or 22 LD cycles. Ten chilled plants of each cultivar remained in LDs for the duration of the experiment. Continuous SDs without chilling resulted in 70%, 40%, 20%, and 10% flowering in `Snow Lady', `Early Sunrise', `Sunray,' and `G. Marconi', respectively. Chilling, followed by a return to continuous SDs, improved flowering in all cultivars compared to SDs without chilling. The number of LD cycles required for 100% flowering varied with cultivar. Ninety percent of the chilled `Early Sunrise' plants flowered with no LD cycles, and 100% flowering was produced by as few as six LD cycles. In `Snow Lady', 100% flowering occurred in chilled plants with no LD cycles and those receiving at least 10 LD cycles. With only six or eight LD cycles, 90% and 80% of these plants, respectively, still flowered. The percentage of `G. Marconi' and `Sunray' plants flowering ranged from 40% to 100% in the chilled treatments, with a general trend for more flowering with an increase in the number of LD inductive cycles. Continuous LDs following chilling resulted in as high or higher percent flowering than any other treatments (100% for `G. Marconi' and 90% for `Sunray'). The effects of LIP were evident in both Coreopsis cultivars but in neither Chrysanthemum superbum cultivar. There was a linear relationship between the number of LDs received and stem length at first flower in `Sunray' and `Early Sunrise'. In both cultivars, a reduction in stem elongation of about 10 cm occurred when plants received only 6 LDs compared to 22 LDs. The number of days from the start of LDs to first flower increased linearly as the number of LD cycles before the transfer back to SDs increased.

Free access

Juvenility and flowering requirements of Chrysanthemum ×superbum Bergmans ex J. Ingram `G. Marconi' and `Snow Lady' were examined by growing plants under short days (SDs) and transferring them to long days (LDs) upon reaching specific true leaf stages. `G. Marconi' plants did not flower in continuous SDs and only sparse flowering occurred in plants transferred to LDs. `Snow Lady' plants transferred from SDs to LDs at the cotyledon stage flowered fastest from seeding (75 days) and had the fewest number of main stem leaves and total leaves (9 and 15, respectively) at the time of first flower. Plants moved from SDs to LDs at the 24 true leaf stage flowered 123 days after seeding and averaged 28 leaves on the main stem and 37 total leaves at the time of first flower. To examine apical floral initiation, plants were distributed between SDs and LDs following transplanting and five plants per treatment were sampled each week thereafter. Microscopic examination revealed floral initiation in plants sampled after just 1 week in LDs and, after 5 weeks, macroscopic terminal flower buds were present. Under SDs, apical floral initiation began after 5 weeks, yet, 9 weeks were required for floral initiation in all five plants sampled.

Free access

Juvenility and flowering requirements of Coreopsis grandiflora Hogg ex Sweet. `Sunray' and C. lanceolata L. `Early Sunrise' were examined by growing plants under short days (SD) and transferring them to long days (LD) upon reaching the designated true leaf stages. Neither cultivar flowered in continuous SD, and `Sunray' remained vegetative in LD. However, LD induced flowering in `Early Sunrise' plants in each leaf count treatment and the loss of juvenility was gradual, with most rapid flowering occurring when plants were transferred to LD at the 16 leaf stage. The limited inductive photoperiod (LIP) inhibited stem elongation of `Early Sunrise' plants in all LD treatments and selectively inhibited axillary flower bud development compared to plants grown in continuous LD. LIP did not affect scape length at first flower even though plant height was significantly diminished if given relatively few LD before transfer to SD. Height reduction was attributed to LIP inhibition of stem elongation with no significant loss of axillary flower bud potential.

Free access