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  • Author or Editor: M. LeRon Robbins x
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Abstract

The French botanist Andre Micheaux, who set out tea plants circa 1800 at Middleton Barony on the Ashley River a few miles from Charleston, S. C., is the first person known to have grown tea in the United States. Dr. Henry Perrine, of plant introduction fame, and Dr. Junius Smith were among the earliest men to campaign for tea production in the United States.

Open Access

Abstract

The South Carolina Agriculture Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture announce the joint release of ‘Carolina’ collard Brassica oleracea L. (Acephala group). ‘Carolina’ offers potential because of its resistance to downy mildew incited by Penospora parasitica (Pers.) ex Fr., because of its desirable horticultural characteristics, and because it broadens the genetic base of collard.

Open Access

Abstract

The South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture announce the joint release of ‘Footlong’ polebean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

Open Access

Abstract

Aqua-Gro (50% polyoxyethylene ester, 50% polyoxyethylene ether), a nonionic commercial surfactant, retarded growth and reduced yield of Zea mays L. ‘Golden Bantam’ and ‘XL-367’ when a 1,000 ppm aqueous solution was applied to the foliage. There was seemingly no toxic effect on Pisum sativum L., Cucumis melo L., or Citrullus vulgaris Schrad.

Open Access

Abstract

Aluminum mulches lowered soil temperatures and reduced heat stress for young tomato transplants, increasing their survival and height. Yields were improved in all mulch treatments. Greatest yields of large and extra-large fruits were obtained from plants grown on aluminum alone, on aluminum in combination with black plastic, and on black plastic alone. Aphids were repelled by the aluminum mulches, while fruit injury increased due to tomato pinworm and tomato fruit worm feeding in these plots.

Open Access

Abstract

The South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture announce the joint release of ‘Charlestowne’ and ‘Roots’ turnip, Brassica campestris L. (Rapifera group), which are resistant to the turnip aphid, Hyadaphis erysiimi (Kattenbach).

Open Access

Abstract

A technique developed for inoculating tomato fruits with anthracnose pathogen consists of placing a spore suspension droplet onto a fruit with a hypodermic syringe and then pricking the epidermis under the droplet with the hypodermic needle. Disease symptoms occurred at room temperature and humidity, thus eliminating the need for controlled temperature and humidity. Detectable lesions developed at 95% and 96% of inoculated sites on ‘Heinz 1350’ and ‘Roma’ fruits, respectively.

Open Access

Abstract

Resistant plant introduction (P.I.) 129027 was hybridized with susceptible ‘Roma’ and ‘Heinz 1350’, and P.I. 127833 was hybridized with ‘Heinz 1350’. Plants of 6 populations (P1, P2, F1, F2, B1P1, and B1P2) of each of 3 crosses (127833 × ‘Roma’, 127833 × ‘H-1350’, 129027 × ‘Roma’) were field-grown and fruits were inoculated in a laboratory. Genetic analysis indicated presence of a leading factor and that 6 genes might be involved in anthracnose reaction. Resistance was partially dominant to susceptibility, and genetic variance was non-additive.

Open Access

Educational and research opportunities utilizing native plant species are being developed by the LSU Agricultural Center through the recent establishment of a native plant arboretum at the Calhoun Research Station. Plants indigenous to Louisiana and surrounding states are being collected and planted in the arboretum for evaluation of potential values for landscaping, in food industries, and/or wildlife management. Native trees being studied include species of oak (Quercus), maple (Acer), hickory (Carya), and dogwood (Cornus). Lesser known species of holly (Ilex) and hawthorn (Crataegus), are being evaluated for commercial production and landscape potential. Fruit being collected for field orchard studies include mayhaw (Crataegus opaca), pawpaw (Asimina triloba), and several native plums (Prunus spp.).

Free access

Abstract

Dime thy letrachloroterephthalate (DCPA) and N,N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide (diphenamid) were effective herbicides for sweetpotato on coarse sand soil. DCPA applied through a sprinkler irrigation system proved effective and reduced costs.

Open Access