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  • Author or Editor: M. L. Tomes x
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Abstract

Seven mutant strains of tomatoes, crimson (ogc), high beta-carotene (B), low total (yellow r), ‘Snowball’ (yellow r), apricot (at), high pigment (hp), ‘Jubilee’ (tangerine, t), and the check cultivar ‘Rutgers’ were surveyed to determine the effects of these fruit pigment mutants on leaf pigments. Chlorophylls a and b, beta-carotene, lutein, violaxanthin, lutein 5,6-epoxide, and neoxanthin were separated chromatographically and quantities were determined spectrophotometrically. Significant differences among strains were found in chlorophylls and beta-carotene levels. Xanthophyll differences were, generally, nonsignificant. A definite pattern of gene effects was suggested. The apricot strain produced the highest levels of chlorophylls and beta-carotene in the leaves; one of the r strains, ‘Snowball’, the lowest.

Parents, F1 and F2 generations involving apricot, yellow (low total), crimson, and normal were analyzed to determine whether these leaf pigment differences could be related to these particular genes. Apricot significantly increased chlorophyll and beta-carotene levels as suggested in the survey. Yellow in a variable background, however, did not lower these pigments significantly.

Pigment synthesis in tomato leaves and fruits was discussed in relation to the gene effects inferred in the survey and the specific gene effects demonstrated in the segregating populations.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Caro-Rich’, an indeterminate high pro-Vitamin A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), was released in January 1973. It was named for its high β-carotene.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Lafayette‘ is a compact, determinate tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) intended for mechanical harvest. It was named for the city of Lafayette, Indiana.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Vermillion’ is a productive, determinate, crimson tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) with excellent fruit color. Its name, which gives attention to its outstanding fruit color, honors a county in Indiana.

Open Access