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  • Author or Editor: M. G. Hamilton x
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Abstract

A parent-offspring test of 21 sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) and 25 open-pollinated offspring from each provided heritability estimates (h2 ± SE) for root fiber (0.47 ± 0.04), weight (0.41 ± 0.04, shape (0.50 ± 0.05), cracking (0.37 ± 0.04), and sprouting (0.37 ± 0.02). These characters were sufficiently independent to allow selection of one, or of any combination simultaneously, without adverse effects on the others.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Sumor’, a multi-use sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], was developed jointly by the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, and Clemson Univ., South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, Edisto Research and Education Center. This cultivar has potential as a high dry matter type for ethanol production and as a white-fleshed garden potato.

Open Access

Abstract

‘HiDry’ is a high dry matter (DM) yielding sweet potato cultivar with high DM content developed jointly by Clemson Univ. and the USDA for industrial uses. It possesses high levels of multiple disease and insect resistances.

Open Access

Abstract

Correlation studies indicate visual and Hunter Lab Color and Color Difference Meter aL ratings are of comparable value for classifying flesh color of sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] roots. Dry matter content was correlated with flesh color, specific gravity, and dry matter yield and with sugar, starch, and sugar + starch (fermentables) contents. Dry matter yield, starch yield, and other responses of seedlings with light and with dark orange flesh color were as expected from correlation studies. Light flesh color and high specific gravity, in combination with high field yield, appear to be useful selection traits for expediting development of cultivars for industrial uses.

Open Access

Abstract

Root knot caused by the southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood) is a serious disease of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) in most production areas of the U. S. and especially in the southern states (3). Considerable variation in pathogenicity of this obligate parasite on sweet potato was reported by Giamalva et al. (1) in 1963. In 1973, Martin and Birchfield (2) reported the discovery of a race of M. incognita that was highly virulent and reproduced abundantly on a sweet potato line, L4-73, that had been established as resistant to root-knot nematode populations commonly found in Louisiana. This strain of M. incognita, herein designated the “resistance breaking” (RB) race, was provided through the courtesy of Dr. W. J. Martin of the Department of Plant Pathology, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. These findings have caused considerable concern about the future of breeding for root knot resistance in sweet potato, since the existence of RB races makes the work much more difficult and complicated. A breeding line of sweet potato (W-51) was developed at the U. S. Vegetable Laboratory, in cooperation with Clemson University, that is resistant to both the common and the RB race of root-knot nematodes (M. incognita). It also carries resistance to fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. batatas (Wr.) Snyd. & Hans.) and the sweet potato flea beetle (Chaetocnema confinis Crotch.). W-51 is being released for use as a root knot resistant parent in sweet potato breeding programs.

Open Access

Abstract

Six sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) lines with a wide range of objectionable fiber content were grown in one location in 1976 and in 2 locations in 1977 to study factors influencing the expression of that trait. We failed to identify environmental factors that would enhance expression of objectionable fiber but did find that large roots tended to have more objectionable fiber than did smaller roots. All roots of high fiber lines did not express objectionable amounts. About 10 US #1 but only 4 jumbo roots of each line would have to be evaluated to have a 95% probability of observing objectionable fiber in high fiber lines. However, Jumbo, US #1 and canning sizes all led to the same relative rankings of lines. Subjective evaluations of baked roots were as effective as objective laboratory tests and could be obtained concurrent with other necessary baking evaluations.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Excel’ sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was developed jointly by the USDA and the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. This cultivar has high yield and excellent baking flavor, in combination with high levels of resistance to a wide array of disease and insect pests. Additionally, it has promise for use in snack foods.

Open Access

Abstract

Six sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) breeding lines, W-71, W-115, W-119, W-125, W-149 and W-154, possessing moderate levels of resistance to the sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers), in combination with resistances to other released. They have dark orange flesh, relatively high yields and generally acceptable canning and baking qualities.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Southern Delite’ sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was developed jointly by the USDA and the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. This cultivar has high yield and excellent baking qualities, in combination with high levels of resistance to a wide array of disease and insect pests.

Open Access