Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: M. Banaras x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

N.K. Lownds, M. Banaras and P.W. Bosland

Physical characteristics [initial water content, surface area, surface area: volume (SA: V) ratio, cuticle weight, epicuticular wax content, and surface morphology] were examined to determine relationships between physical properties and water-loss `rate in pepper fruits. `Keystone', `NuMex R Naky', and `Santa Fe Grande' peppers, differing in physical characteristics, were stored at 8, 14, or 20C. Water-loss rate increased linearly with storage time at each temperature and was different for each cultivar. Water-loss rate was positively correlated with initial water content at 14 and 20C, SA: V ratio at all temperatures, and cuticle thickness at 14 and 20C. Water-loss rate was negatively correlated with surface area and epicuticular wax content at all temperatures. Stomata were absent on the fruit surface, and epicuticular wax was amorphous for each cultivar.

Free access

N.K. Lownds, M. Banaras and P.W. Bosland

Nine pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum L.) representing five pepper types were studied to determine water-loss rates, flaccidity, color, and disease development when stored at 8,14, or 20C for 14 days. Water-loss rate was markedly higher at 14C than at 8C, and was somewhat lower at 20C than at 14C. There were significant differences in water-loss rates between pepper cultivar with `NuMex R Naky', `NuMex Conquistador', and `New Mexico 6-4' (New Mexican-type peppers) having the highest water-loss rates. Flaccidity followed a pattern similar to water loss at each storage temperature, suggesting a direct relationship. Color development was cultivar- and package-dependent, and ratings increased with temperature. Placing pepper fruit in perforated polyethylene packages reduced water-loss rates 20 times or more, so that water loss no longer limited postharvest storage. Packaging also eliminated flaccidity and reduced color development across cultivars at 14 and 20C. Packaged fruit, however, developed diseases that limited postharvest longevity.