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  • Author or Editor: M. A. Tung x
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Abstract

The incidence of surface pitting and bruises in sweet charries (Prunus avium L. cv. Van) increased with distance of free fall. Mature fruit developed less surface pitting but developed more flattened bruises than less mature fruit in response to impact forces. Increased impact force applied to fruit resulted in a decrease in titratable acidity after storage. Fruit firmness and bioyield determined after storage increased to a maximum with the height of free fall of 45 cm for the intermediate fruit maturity only. Fruit contact with rough surfaces resulted in a significantly higher incidence of surface pitting than in fruit damaged by smooth surfaces.

Open Access

Abstract

Pot-grown ‘Angie Physic’ hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.) plants at the tight bud and blooming stages were stored in darkness for 3, 6, or 9 days at 4.5, 10.0, 15.5, 21.0, 26.5, or 32.0C, and then placed in a greenhouse for 21 days. Plants showed the least amount of damage at 10.0 or 15.5C or when stored for 3 days. Plants stored at 10.0 or 15.5C had delayed flowering, larger and more flowers, less flower bud and leaf abscission, and a higher plant quality. Storage for 6 or 9 days resulted in plants with smaller and fewer flowers, greater bud and leaf abscission, less fresh weight, and a lower quality.

Open Access

Abstract

Flowering performance of crossandra, a potted flowering plant rising in popularity, is not always satisfactory under low interior light levels. However, research has not been conducted to determine the response of this species to low light levels and lighting duration. The response of plants to light conditions is variable. Aphelandra plants were taller but had suppressed flowering under low light (5).

Open Access

Abstract

Preharvest sprays or postharvest dips of CaCl2 decreased the incidence of surface pitting of ‘Van’ cherries (Prunus avium L.) resulting from impact damage. Inclusion of a surfactant and thickener in the dip enhanced Ca uptake by cherries in storage. Ca from postharvest dips penetrated the cherry mesocarp rapidly in storage. Maximum Ca uptake by the cherry mesocarp was attained when the pH of the dipping solution was 7. However, postharvest Ca dips were most effective in preventing surface pitting when their pH was 4.

Open Access

Abstract

In the paper, Texture Modification of ‘Van’ Sweet Cherries by Postharvest Calcium Treatments by P. D. Lidster, S. W. Porritt, and M. A. Tung (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 103(4):527-530. 1978), the caption for Fig. 1 should read: Fig. 1. Ca penetration into ‘Van’ cherry. Log ppm Ca = 2.920-0.003430 Day + 0.1536 Log Day (P 1%, R2=0.94). Flesh Ca of undipped control = 545 ppm.

Open Access

Abstract

A delay in storage at 0°C prior to impact damage decreased the incidence of surface disorders due to mechanical damage in ‘Van’ cherries (Prunus avium L.). A 4% CaCl2 plus 0.25% Keltrol postharvest dip reduced the incidence of pitting and surface marking at all delay periods after dipping.

Open Access

Abstract

Calcium (Ca) moved rapidly into sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium L.) flesh and reached a maximum in 7 days after a postharvest calcium chloride (CaCl2) dip. Flesh Ca content was increased by increasing the CaCl2 or thickener concentration or by prolonged immersion time in the dipping solution. After 21 days of 0°C storage, texture attributes of fruit firmness and bioyield were positively correlated with fresh Ca levels.

Open Access

Abstract

A rapid method for determining firmness of fruits of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) using the Ottawa Texture Measuring System is described. Firmness was determined by averaging the mean slope of force-deformation curves for 15 individual cherries per replication. Fruit of intermediate maturity was less from (P < 5%) than more immature or mature fruit Three Ca sprays applied prior to harvest firmed fruit (P < 5%) at harvest. Cherry bioyield and deformation values were not significantly influenced by fruit maturity or CaCl2 sprays at harvest

Open Access