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  • Author or Editor: M. A. Shehata x
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Abstract

Ten of 123 lines of carrot (Daucus carota L.) were identified with moderate to partial canker resistance to a highly virulent isolate of Rhizoctonia solani Kuehn AG 2-2.

Open Access

Abstract

Minnesota 266 is an early maturing, andromonecious, short-internode breeding line of muskmelon, Cucumis melo L., from the vegetable improvement program of the Departments of Horticultural Science and Landscape Architecture, and Plant Pathology. It has value for the home garden and, in addition, it should be useful as a germplasm source for selection as well as for the development of commercial hybrids and/or types for mechanical harvesting.

Open Access

Abstract

Minnesota 108 is a breeding line of pea (Pisum sativum L.) developed by cooperative effort of the Departments of Horticultural Science and Landscape Architecture and Plant Pathology. This germplasm combines near-commercial type and resistance to common root rot caused by Aphanomyces euteiches (Drechs.), and to fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f sp. pisi (Linford) race 1 Snyder & Hansen. It should be useful as a germplasm source for the transfer of root rot resistance to commercial cultivars by means of an improved testing technique (2).

Open Access

Abstract

Minnesota 101 is a monoecious, short intemode breeding line of muskmelon, Cucumis melo L. Its primary use is envisaged as that of a breeding line useful as a parent in the production of F1 hybrid cultivars, and as germplasm in the long term improvement of muskmelon.

Open Access

Abstract

A controlled environment technique using freshly silked, excised ears artificially infested with 1st instar larvae was developed for evaluating sweet com (Zea mays L.) for resistance to 2nd-brood European com borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hiibner). At 14 days, infested ears of the moderately resistant dent inbred ‘B52’ held in plastic bags at 27°C (day) 21° (night), high humidity, and 16 hour photoperiod (8.6 klx) had fewer 4th and 5th instar larvae and possibly lower larval weight Use of this technique could improve the efficiency of screening via artificial infestation by reducing environmentally caused variability.

Open Access

Abstract

Shoot tip cuttings of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) taken at various times, ages, and condition were subjected to several pre- and post-selection techniques known to influence rooting in other species. Succinic acid-2,2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH) applied 1 week before shoot tip harvest increased the rooting of cuttings. Neither time of day cuttings were prepared (7 AM or 1 PM) nor fruit load influenced rooting. Sand culture under mist, at 27°C (day), 21° (night), in the greenhouse was superior to other rooting methods tested. Cultivars varied in rooting. Cuttings from early planting rooted better than those from late plantings.

Open Access

Abstract

An “Environment Shift Technique” (EST), utilizing controlled environment chambers and a greenhouse bench, gave uniform and good separation of common root rot resistant from susceptible plants of pea (Pisum sativum L.). EST, based on environmental control during 2 phases of testing, reduced the resistance breakdown at an early stage of host development. Separation was based on time of plant death. Changes in the environment enabled the resistant host to overcome the heavy inoculation and live long enough to produce seeds. In EST vs. greenhouse testing, standard concentrations of inoculum produced different effects based on dry root weight and time of plant death. Utilization of EST in pedigree selection resulted in the development of Minn. 108, an A. euteiches resistant line of commercial type.

Open Access

Abstract

Minnesota 494-A11 is a unique source of common pea (Pisum sativum L.) germ-plasm. It has moderate to high resistance to common root rot caused by Aphanomyees euteiehes Drechs. (3, 6) and high resistance to fusarium wilt races 1, 2 and 6 caused by Fusarium oxysporum Linford f. sp. pisi Snyd. & Hans. It is intermediate in reaction to race 5 of that organism (7). It also has moderate tolerance to fusarium root rot caused by Fusarium solani and to root rot caused by Pythium ultimum. However, it does not have resistance to Rhizoctonia solani. No other genotype of P. sativum is known to have the above combination of resistanee/tolerance to so many soil-borne pathogens.

Open Access