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Les Frey and Jules Janick

Shoot regeneration in carnation (Dianthus catyophyllus L.) was influenced by genotype, explant source, and plant growth regulator balance. Plants were regenerated from petals, calyxes, nodes, internodes, and leaves, but only petals, calyxes, and nodes were regenerative from all three cultivars examined (`Scania', `Improved White Sire', `Sandra'). Maximum proliferation was achieved with petals on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 0.05 μm TDZ and 0.5 μm NAA. Shoot initiation originated from cells near vascular regions and perhaps from epidermal cells in petals and via organogenic callus from other explants. There was no evidence of chimeral separation from petals or callus, but somaclonal variants (3.3%) were observed involving petal hue and plant dwarfness. Unstable color patterns were observed in tissue-cultured regenerants of `Scania' and `Improved White Sire' similar in type and frequency to propagules derived from cuttings; none were observed for tissue-cultured or cutting-derived plants of `Sandra'. Chemical names used: N-pheny1-N′-l,2,3 -thiadiazol-5-ylurea [thidiazuron (TDZ)]; 1-napthaleneacetic acid (NM).

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Les Frey, Yehoshua Saranga, and Jules Janick

Somatic embryogenesis was induced from internodal callus of `Scania', `Improved White Sim', and `Sandra' carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.). The optimum protocol for the induction of somatic embryogenesis included initiation of callus in liquid basal Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 3.0 μm 2,4-D followed by transfer to liquid basal medium lacking 2,4-D for embryo development. Somatic embryos originated from single cells and early embryonic development proceeded conventionally (i.e., via globular, heart-shaped, and torpedo stages), but clearly developed apical or root meristems were not always formed. A few embryos developed into seedlings and were acclimatized to ex vitro conditions. Chemical name used: 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D).