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  • Author or Editor: Len Burkhart x
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Selected cultivars of redbud (Cercis canadensis L.) and related Cercis species are usually propagated by grafting, but the success rate is low and other problems can be associated with the rootstock. Micropropagation would solve many of these problems. Shoots from a 25 year-old redbud were collected during July 1989 and established in vitro on modified MS medium. Shoots proliferated poorly with lower concentrations of Benzyladenine (BA) and high concentrations of BA caused shoot tip abortion. Similar problems with red-silver hybrid maples were solved by the use of Thidiazuron (TZ) in the medium. Established 2 cm redbud shoots were treated with TZ (0, 0.05, and 0.1 uM) and BA (0, 1 and 5 uM) in a factorial arrangement to test for shoot proliferation. After 4 weeks of the treatment with 0.1 uM TZ and 5 uM BA, mean shoot number was 4.6 compared to 1.1 shoots with no BA or TZ in the medium. Further experiments with rooting treatments will be presented.

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Rooting of shoots from in vitro culture of most conifers can be difficult. An antigibberellin, ancymidol, has been shown to promote rooting of in vitro proliferated shoots of asparagus clones, but it has not been tested on conifers. Ancymidol and flurprimidol was tested for rooting on established cultures of Lake States white pine (Pinus strobus). Pulse treatments containing 5 uM ancymidol and 0.5 uM NAA gave 43% rooting, while pulse treatment with 0.5 uM NAA resulted in 7% root formation. Flurprimidol also stimulated root formation on white pine shoots, but was less than ancymidol. Thuja occidentalis `Hetz's Wintergreen' formed roots on 87% of in vitro proliferated shoots when given a pulse treatment with 5 uM ancymidol and 50 uM NAA. Shoots initiated an average of 10 roots after 60 days on vermiculite containing 1/2 liquid MCM medium.

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Rooting of shoots from in vitro culture of most conifers can be difficult. An antigibberellin, ancymidol, has been shown to promote rooting of in vitro proliferated shoots of asparagus clones, but it has not been tested on conifers. Ancymidol and flurprimidol was tested for rooting on established cultures of Lake States white pine (Pinus strobus). Pulse treatments containing 5 uM ancymidol and 0.5 uM NAA gave 43% rooting, while pulse treatment with 0.5 uM NAA resulted in 7% root formation. Flurprimidol also stimulated root formation on white pine shoots, but was less than ancymidol. Thuja occidentalis `Hetz's Wintergreen' formed roots on 87% of in vitro proliferated shoots when given a pulse treatment with 5 uM ancymidol and 50 uM NAA. Shoots initiated an average of 10 roots after 60 days on vermiculite containing 1/2 liquid MCM medium.

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