Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Leland E. Francois x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Leland E. Francois

Globe artichokes recently have been planted in the irrigated desert area of southern California. Soils in this area are, or have the potential to become, highly saline from the application of saline irrigation water. Thus, a 2-year field plot study was conducted. A control and five saline treatments were imposed by irrigation with waters that contained equal weights of NaCl and CaCl. Bud yield and vegetative growth were measured. For the two years, relative bud yield was unaffected up to a soil salinity of 6.1 dS·m [electrical conductivity of the saturated soil extract (EC,)]. Each unit increase in salinity above 6.1 dS·m reduced yield by 11.5%. These results place artichoke in the moderately salt-tolerant category. Yield reduction was attributed primarily to reduced bud weight rather than bud count. Vegetative growth was more tolerant to salt stress than was bud production. Chloride concentration in midrib and blade tissue increased as salinity increased.

Free access

Leland E. Francois

Garlic (Allium sativum L.) salt tolerance was determined in a 2-year field plot study. Saline treatments were imposed by irrigating with water that was salinized with 1 NaCl: 1 CaCl2 (w/w). The electrical conductivities of the irrigation water was 1.4 (control), 3.1, 5.8, 8.8, 12.0, and 14.8 dS·m–1 in 1990 to 1991 and 1.4, 2.0, 3.9, 5.8, 7.8, and 9.9 dS·m–1 in 1991 to 1992. Considering both years, relative bulb yield was reduced 14.3% with each unit increase in soil salinity >3.9 dS·m–1. Increasing soil salinity significantly reduced all yield components (i.e., bulb weight and diameter; plants per unit area). Percentage of solids in the bulb was significantly reduced as soil salinity increased. Leaf tissue accumulated significantly higher Cl, Na, and Ca concentrations then did bulb tissue.