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  • Author or Editor: Leisha Vance x
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A series of soilless root substrates was formulated to contain either 20% composted pine bark or perlite and 0%, 10%, 20%, or 30% feather fiber, with the remainder being sphagnum peat. The substrates containing bark or perlite with 0% feather fiber served as the controls for the bark- and perlite-containing substrates respectively. For root substrates containing perlite, the inclusion of feather fiber increased the total pore space compared with the control substrate. For substrates containing bark, the inclusion of 10% or 20% feather fiber increased total pore space, but the inclusion of 30% feather fiber reduced total pore space. For substrates containing perlite, the inclusion of feather fiber increased the air-filled pore space compared with the control, and as the percentage feather fiber increased, air-filled pore space increased. For substrates containing bark, the inclusion of 10% or 20% feather fiber increased air-filled pore space, but air-filled pore space of the substrate containing 30% feather fiber was not different from the control. For all substrates, the inclusion of feather fiber reduced the water-holding capacity, but water-holding capacities for all substrates remained within recommended ranges. The bulk density of feather fiber-containing substrates was not different from the control except for the substrate containing 30% feather fiber with bark, which had a higher bulk density than its control without feather fiber. The difference in physical properties of the 30% feather fiber substrate with bark from its control substrate was attributed to the aggregation of the feather fiber when formulated with composted bark. Aggregation of feather fiber when blended into substrates at levels of 30% or higher would create difficulties in achieving uniform substrates.

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