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  • Author or Editor: LeMoyne Hogan x
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Abstract

‘Beersheva’ suaeda (Suaeda vera Forssk.), Chenopodiaceae, was released by the Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station to provide a salt-tolerant, drought-tolerant, bright green, perennial groundcover adapted to the arid southwestern United States and similar regions of the world.

Open Access

Abstract

Arizona rosewood (Vauquelinia californica Torr). Rosaceae, is native to southern Arizona and northern Mexico at elevations of 750 to 1500 m (1). ‘Molino’ and ‘Tonto’ Arizona rosewood were released by the Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station to provide evergreen, drought-tolerant, flowering shrubs adapted to the low and medium deserts of the southwestern United States and similar regions of the world.

Open Access

Abstract

Cultivars or germplasm with published performance records are presently unavailable for jojoba. Only one cultivar, Mirov, is widely recognized in the industry, and it is not widely planted. Unfortunately, published performance records do not exist for this cultivar. Most existing commercial acreage has been planted with seed or seedlings collected from many different locations, or with cuttings collected from selected female plants growing in seedling plantings. There is a need for cultivars of known performance to both increase seed production of commercial plantings and to provide standards with which to compare other clones. The purpose of this report is to briefly describe three jojoba clones that have been studied for 8 years and have performed well in a field planting and to announce their release.

Open Access

Abstract

Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schneider) until recently was a relatively unknown Sonoran Desert shrub. Realization that the unique liquid wax in the seed could be substituted for the oil of the endangered sperm whale and that the plant could be grown with relatively small amounts of irrigation water has stimulated much interest among researchers in arid regions throughout the world. Major research programs on the domestication of jojoba are being conducted in the Department of Plant Sciences of the University of Arizona and the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences of the University of California-Riverside. Research programs are also underway at the Ben-Gurion University at BeerSheva, Israel, by state and federal agencies in Sonora and Baja California, Mexico, and in a number of other countries with arid and semi-arid regions. An International Committee on jojoba was formed in November, 1972 and 3 international conferences on jojoba have been held to date. The 4th international jojoba conference is scheduled for November 5-7, 1980, in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

Open Access

Abstract

The interspecific baccharis hybrid ‘Centennial’ has been released by the Univ. of Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station as a landscape plant suited for arid regions. The name ‘Centennial’ was given to commemorate the 100th year of the opening of the Univ. of Arizona as a land grant college.

Open Access