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  • Author or Editor: Lawrence Risse x
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Abstract

‘Charleston Gray’ watermelons [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai] exposed to various concentrations of ethylene (C2H4) for 3 or 7 days of storage at 18°C deteriorated rapidly. Exposure to C2H4 reduced the rind thickness and firmness of melons. Almost all of the melons exposed to 30 or 60 μl/liter ethylene for 7 days were unacceptable for consumption.

Open Access

Size 56 grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) were sampled biweekly from importers Rotterdam, the Netherlands from October 1992 through September 1993. For each sample, fruit size, weight, diameter, peel thickness, internal color, juice volume, total soluble solids (TSS), and total acid (TA) were measured for three cultivars `Marsh White', `Ruby Red' and `Star Ruby' from 12 countries of origin. Florida fruit followed by Cuban fruit weighed more, had the thinnest peel, the most juice, the lowest TA, and the highest TSS/TA ratio for all three cultivars compared to most other origins. Spanish `Ruby Red' and `Star Ruby' fruit weighed the least and had the least amount of juice compared to other origins. Turkish fruit had the highest TA and the lowest TSS/TA ratio for all three cultivars. Israelian `Marsh White' and `Star Ruby' had the highest TSS.

Free access

Chopped `Salinas' crisphead lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) was packaged in four types of polymeric films and stored at 1 or 5C for 14 days. Discoloration and off-flavors developed in lettuce stored in the two films in which the naturally produced CO2 rose above 20%. In the two films (oriented low-density polyethylene) with O2 transmission rates higher than 3000 ml·m-2· day-1·atm-1 at 22C, CO2 remained below 20%, O2 was between ≈ 2% and 15%, and the lettuce was acceptable after 14 days of storage at either 1 or 5C. Appearance and flavor were affected more by temperature than by length of storage.

Free access

Abstract

Tomato transplants were packed 4 ways: 1) conventionally, 2) densely, 3) with soil adhering to the roots, and 4) moist plants with moist soil adhering to the roots. During transit from Georgia to Ohio, the temperature in those crates that were packed densely was 4° to 5°C higher than any of the other treatments. Furthermore, plant survival and subsequent yields in the field were reduced by packing too densely. When tomato transplants were stored at 10°, 16°, 21°, and 27° for 4 days, the percentage of dry matter in plant stems increased, and the survival of transplants decreased with increased storage temperature.

Open Access

Comparisons were made of the major physical and chemical characteristics of seven cultivars of apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) produced and imported into Western Europe from 13 origins. During the 1990-91 marketing season, `Delicious', `Golden Delicious', `Granny Smith', `Elstar', `Jonagold', `Gala', and `Fuji' apples were included in the study. Physical characteristics evaluated were length-to-diameter ratio, shape, external defects, internal defects, water core, bruises, firmness, blush surface, and color. Chemical characteristics evaluated were starch, juice content, soluble solids, acids, and ascorbic acid. Significant differences in some of these quality characteristics were found between the different origins. Apples produced in the United States, particularly `Delicious', had some superior quality characteristics compared to fruit from other origins.

Full access

Abstract

Individually plastic-film-wrapped or waxed ‘Marsh’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) were conditioned (34.5°C, 3 days) at low (30% ± 5% RH) or high (95% ± 5% RH) humidity before cold storage (10° ± 1°; 90% ± 5% RH). Predisposition to storage decay by conditioning was investigated by examining fruit inoculated with penicillium spores either before or after conditioning. Penicillium rot in fruit that was inoculated after conditioning was reduced in plastic-film-wrapped fruit (37%) relative to waxed fruit (74%) only after 2 weeks at 10° ± 1° + 1 week at 21° ± 1° storage. Of the fruit inoculated prior to conditioning, the incidence of decay was lower in fruit conditioned at high RH than in fruit not conditioned or conditioned at low RH. No coating effect of wax or plastic-film was observed. Fruit quality tended to be adversely affected by conditioning, but this effect became less obvious with storage. Fruit coated with plastic film had a better general appearance than waxed grapefruit.

Open Access

Comparisons were made of the major physical and chemical characteristics of seven cultivars of apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) produced and imported into Western Europe from 13 origins. During the 1990-91 (September-August) marketing season, `Delicious', `Golden Delicious' and `Granny Smith' apples from the U.S. were included in the study. Physical characteristics evaluated were length-to-diameter ratio, shape, external defects, internal defects, watercore, bruises, firmness, blush surface and color. Chemical characteristics evaluated were starch, juice content, soluble solids, acids and ascorbic acid. Statistically significant differences in some of these quality characteristics were found between the different origins. U.S. produced apples, particularly `Delicious', had some superior quality characteristics compared to fruit from other origins.

Free access