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  • Author or Editor: Lawford Baxter x
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Pods of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench) stored in an atmosphere of 5% O2 and 10% CO2 at 10 ± 1C were compared with pods stored in air at the same temperature to determine the effects of storage environment on physical characteristics and ethylene evolution of the pods. Controlled-atmosphere-(CA) stored pods lost less weight, retained total solids and chlorophyll better, and had a higher mucilage viscosity than air-stored pods. Toughness, fibrousness, and incidence of microbial decay were lower in CA-stored pods than in air-stored pods. No differences were seen in the levels of alcohol-insoluble solids or discoloration of the cut surface between pods from the two storage environments. Ethylene evolution was lower in CA- than air-stored pods.

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Asparagus spears (Asparagus officinalis L.) stored 28 days at 2C in air, a flow-through controlled-atmosphere (CA) system, or 14 days in polymeric film consumer packages were evaluated in respect to compositional and quality changes. CA-stored spears retained more sugars, organic acids, and soluble proteins than spears stored in air. Spears stored in vented consumer packages had a useful life of 14 days, whereas those in nonvented packages started to break down after 8 days. Spears from vented packages lost more weight but retained more sugars and organic acids than those from nonvented packages.

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Abstract

Four levels (1.1, 2.3, 4.6, and 9.1 g/kg seed) of the hydrophilic polymer Waterlock B100 were used as seed coatings to enhance stand establishment and plant growth of sweet corn (Zea mays) and cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata) during the spring and summer of 1983 on 2 soil types in Minnesota. The level with the best overall response in 1983 was used in 1984 to observe the response of 4 sweet corn hybrids. The 2.3 and 4.6 g treatment were most beneficial in enhancing stand establishment in sweet corn. At all levels, however, Waterlock B100 had a deleterious effect on cowpea germination and seedling development. One sweet corn hybrid showed a significant positive response to the coating during 1984. This reponse was attributed to a uniform pericarp which allowed an even seed coating.

Open Access

Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench) pods stored In a controlled atmosphere (CA) of 5% O2 and 10% CO2 at 11 ± 1C and in air at the same temperature (RA) were compared to determine the effects of the two storage environments on changes in sugars, organic acids, proteins and amino acids, and ascorbic acid contents within the tissue. Pods were sampled at 3-day intervals for 12 days. CA-stored pods generally had greater retention of sugars, soluble proteins, and amino acids than RA-stored pods. Citric, malic, and ascorbic acids contents of CA pods also declined more slowly than those of RA pods.

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Abstract

A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the hydrophilic polymer Waterlock B100 on the imbibition, respiration, and germination of seeds of the sweet corn (Zea mays L. var. saccharum) hybrid ‘Mevak’ at soil water matric potentials of -0.01, -0.40, -1.0, and - 1.5 MPa. Coated seeds had a higher final percentage of imbibition, higher rates of respiration, and germination at -0.01 and -0.40 MPa than uncoated seeds, but as the water potential decreased, the seed coating had a deleterious effect on the physiological processes leading to germination.

Open Access

Abstract

Fibrousness or toughness is a major factor influencing quality of vegetables; highly fibrous vegetables are unappealing to consumers. Fibrousness results from lignified cell walls in the pericycle and vascular bundles. Several methods have been used to determine fibrousness: the blender method (3), the cold water method (7), alcohol-insoluble solids (1), the fibrometer (6), the shear press (5), and machines such as the Instron Universal Testing Machine (4). While each of these methods is reliable for determining fibrousness of vegetable tissue, several require considerable time and/or expense. Also, in the case of the fibrometer, the results can be influenced by sample diameter (2). This note describes a simple, inexpensive procedure for determining fibrousness of vegetables using a juicerator.

Open Access