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  • Author or Editor: L.H. Zhang x
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We examined effects of single-layer glass and double-layer antifog polyethylene films on growth and flowering of stock (Matthiola incana L.) and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majalis L.) in a 3-year period. Stock produced more buds/spike with shorter but thicker stems under single-layer glass and under antifog 3-year polyethylene, and showed higher photosynthetic capacity (P c) under single-layer glass than under other covers regardless of light regimes. Similarly, growth and flowering of snapdragon were significantly better under single-layer glass than in polyethylene houses. A supplemental light of 60 μmol·m-2·s-1 accelerated flowering by 20 to 25 days, improved flower quality, and eliminated differences in plant growth and quality of snapdragon between covering treatments. The P c of stock was lower under all polyethylene covers than under single-layer glass. Among the three antifog polyethylene films, a slightly higher P c was measured for plants under antifog 3-year polyethylene. However, there was no difference among covering treatments in the net photosynthetic rate (P N) at low light level (canopy level). Supplemental lighting reduced P c of stock leaves, especially under single-layer glass, and diminished differences in P c among covering treatments. Dry mass was more influenced by larger leaf area caused by higher leaf temperature than by P N. Overall, antifog 3-year polyethylene was a good covering material when both plant quality and energy saving were considered.

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Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed from Rosa wichurana Crépin to combine two previously constructed tetraploid rose (Rosa hybrida L.) genetic maps. To isolate SSR-containing sequences from rose a small-insert genomic library was constructed from diploid Rosa wichurana and screened with several SSR probes. Specific primers were designed for 43 unique SSR regions, of which 30 primer pairs gave rise to clear PCR products. Seventeen SSR primer pairs (57%) produced polymorphism in the tetraploid rose 90-69 mapping family. These markers were incorporated into existing maps of the parents 86-7 and 82-1134, which were constructed primarily with AFLP markers. The current map of the male parent, amphidiploid 86-7, consists of 286 markers assigned to 14 linkage groups and covering 770 cm. The map of the female tetraploid parent, 82-1134, consists of 256 markers assigned to 20 linkage groups and covering 920 cm. Nineteen rose SSR loci were mapped on the 86-7 map and 11 on the 82-1134 map. Several homeologous linkage groups within maps were identified based on SSR markers. In addition, some of the SSR markers provided anchoring points between the two parental maps. SSR markers were also useful for joining small linkage groups. Based on shared SSR markers, consensus orders for four rose linkage groups between parental maps were generated. Microsatellite markers developed in this study will provide valuable tools for many aspects of rose research including future consolidation of diploid and tetraploid rose genetic linkage maps, genetic, phylogenetic and population analyses, cultivar identification, and marker-assisted selection.

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The procedure for Heuchera villosa ‘Caramel’ propagation was investigated, which involves shoot regeneration, rooting of regenerated shoots, and acclimation of regenerated plantlets. Petioles, as explants, were cultured on MS medium supplemented with 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA), benzylaminopurine (BA), thidiazuron (TDZ) and callus formed on all media. Shoots were observed to proliferate from callus on media with BA and NAA, whereas no shoots regenerated on media with TDZ and NAA. On media containing 0.5 or 1.0 mg·L−1 BA in combination with NAA, the regenerated shoots showed severe hyperhydricity, whereas on media containing 0.1 mg·L−1 BA in combination with NAA, the regenerated shoots grew normally. The highest shoot induction rate, 90.6%, was obtained on media containing 0.1 mg·L−1 BA and 0.01 mg·L−1 NAA. The effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), and NAA on rooting of H. villosa ‘Caramel’ was explored. The highest rooting rate (95%) was obtained on 1/2 MS medium containing 0.2 mg·L−1 NAA. In the subsequent acclimation experiments, about 85% of rooted plantlets survived and grew normally.

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