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D.C. Sanders, L.M. Reyes, D.W. Monks, K.M. Jennings, F.J. Louws and J.G. Driver

Tomato, pepper and cucumber were grown for consecutive years using compost from two North Carolina cities (Lexington and Edenton) and McGill Composts (CMC) sources and CMC amended with Tracoderma 382. Treatments included compost with an untreated control and Telone C-35 (Telone) with and without additional fertilizer. The objective was to evaluate compost influence on yield and pest management. Results showed significant differences between treatments and among years. Cucumber and pepper had higher total and marketable yields in 2005 than in 2004. Although tomato yield was lower in 2005 than in 2004 it was evident that CMC+Telone had a higher marketable and total plant dry weight in both years. Two year data showed that combinations of treatments with CMC and Telone (Telone+fertilizer, CMC+Telone, CMC+T382) produced higher yield for tomato and cucumber. Composts from Lexington and Edenton produced more number 2 grade peppers, but treatments did not differ in total and marketable yield. In general compost treatments with or without amendments showed better results in crop yields than the control. Weed counts by species were determined on all plots. Pepper had the greatest number of weeds relative to cucumber and tomato. Organic amendments seem to increase the action of the compost source in several crops. Combination of treatments may depend on the particular crop.

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R. Aynaou, F.M. Woods, R. Shewfelt, J.E. Brown, S. Tuzun, J.H. Cherry and L.G. Sanders

The ability of two tomato cultivars, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VFNTCherry (chill sensitive) and L. esculentum × L. pimpinellifollim cv. New York 280 (chill tolerant) to acclimate to low temperature storage at 2 °C were compared following prior temperature preconditioning. The activities of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase and electrolyte leakage were monitored during a 15-day preconditioning period. Low temperature preconditioning reduced membrane damage in both fruit. In contrast, high temperature preconditioning accelerated the rate of leakage in VFNT, while fruit of NY 280 remained relatively undamaged. Low temperature preconditioning stimulated a 4-fold increase in catalase and peroxidase activities in fruit of NY280. High-temperature preconditioning appeared only to benefit fruit of NY280. Regardless of pretreatment, no significant change in superoxide dismutase activities were observed for either cultivar. These findings suggest that the ability to acclimate to low temperature stress may correlate with increased levels of catalase and peroxidase.

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D.C. Sanders, L.M. Reyes, D.W. Monks, K.M. Jennings, F.J. Louws and J.G. Driver

Tomato, pepper, and cucumber were grown for consecutive years using compost from two North Carolina cities (Lexington and Edenton) and McGill Composts (CMC) sources and CMC amended with Tracoderma 382. Treatments included compost with an untreated control and Telone C-35 (Telone) with and without additional fertilizer. The objective was to evaluate compost influence on yield and pest management. Results showed significant differences between treatments and among years. Cucumber and pepper had higher total and marketable yields in 2005 than in 2004.

Although tomato yield was lower in 2005 than in 2004 it was evident that CMC+Telone had a higher marketable and total plant dry weight in both years. Two year data showed that combinations of treatments with CMC and Telone (Telone+fertilizer, CMC+Telone, CMC+T382) produced higher yield for tomato and cucumber. Composts from Lexington and Edenton produced more number 2 grade peppers, but treatments did not differ in total and marketable yield. In general compost treatments with or without amendments showed better results in crop yields than the control. Weed counts by species were determined on all plots. Pepper had the greatest number of weeds relative to cucumber and tomato. Organic amendments seem to increase the action of the compost source in several crops. Combination of treatments may depend on the particular crop.