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  • Author or Editor: L. H. Stover x
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Abstract

‘Tampa’ grape (Vitis spp.) has been released because of its superiority to ‘Dog Ridge’ (1) and other rootstocks currently used in Florida. It has less tendency to sprout from below the graft union and induces greater growth and yield of scions.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Daytona’, a pink bunch grape (Vitis X sp.) recommended for fresh fruit consumption, has been released by the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Daytona’ is resistant to Pierce’s disease (PD), has vini-fera-like fresh fruit character, and has larger bunch and berry size than other PD-resistant cultivars. ‘Daytona’ is suited to homeowner use in areas where PD is a limiting factor to grape growing.

Open Access

Abstract

Under conditions favoring Pierce’s disease (PD) infection in the vineyards at Leesburg, Florida, 222 Euvitis scion clones, 60 Muscadinia clones, and 49 Euvitis rootstock clones were grown and observed for PD symptoms for 8 or more years. There were 21 PD-resistant scion clones, 20 of which derived their resistance from 1 or more of 4 species: Vitis smalliana Bailey, V. simpsoni Munson, V. shuttleworthi House, and V. aestivalis Michx. There were 22 PD-resistant Muscadinia clones, predominantly of V. rotundifolia Michx. background. There were 15 Euvitis rootstock clones with resistance derived from one of six native species: V. candicans Engelm., V. champini Planch., V. cordifolia Michx., V. shuttleworthi, V. simpsoni, and V. smalliana.

Open Access

Cultivar and planting site are two factors that often receive minimal attention, but can have a significant impact on the quality of apple (Malus ×domestica) produced. A regional project, NE-183 The Multidisciplinary Evaluation of New Apple Cultivars, was initiated in 1995 to systematically evaluate 20 newer apple cultivars on Malling.9 (M.9) rootstock across 19 sites in North America. This paper describes the effect of cultivar and site on fruit quality and sensory attributes at a number of the planting sites for the 1998 through 2000 growing seasons. Fruit quality attributes measured included fruit weight, length: diameter ratio, soluble solids concentration (SSC), titratable acidity (TA), flesh firmness, red overcolor, and russet. Fruit sensory characteristics rated included crispness, sweetness, and juiciness, based on a unipolar intensity scale (where 1 = least and 5 = most), and acidity, flavor, attractiveness, and desirability based on a bipolar hedonic scale (where 1 = dislike and 5 = like extremely). All fruit quality and sensory variables measured were affected by cultivar. The two-way interaction of cultivar and planting site was significant for all response variables except SSC, TA, russet, crispness, and sweetness ratings. The SSC: TA ratio was strongly correlated with sweetness and acidity sensory rating, but was weakly correlated with flavor rating. The results demonstrate that no one cultivar is ideally suited for all planting sites and no planting site is ideal for maximizing the quality of all apple cultivars.

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