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  • Author or Editor: L. H. Stolzy x
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Abstract

Citrus leaves from plants supplied with low soil oxygen showed a decreased sum of protein amino acids, while the free amino acids sum increased. Leaves from Phytophthora spp. infested plants contained a higher free amino acids sum than uninfested. The orange leaves, Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck cv. Atwood navel, contained a higher sum of protein amino acids than lemon leaves, Citrus limon L. Burm. cv. Prior Lisbon, although both of these species were budded on sweet orange rootstock, Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck cv. Bessie. Leaves from the orange scion contained lower concn of glutamic acid, glycine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine, and higher aspartic acid and phenylalanine than the lemon leaves. The sum of the free amino acids in the orange leaves was higher than in lemon leaves. Significant interaction effects on free cystine, methionine, and tyrosine were caused by Phytophthora spp. infestation in the 2 species.

Open Access

Abstract

Protein amino acids in leaves of Phytophthora spp.-infested or noninfested plants were not affected measurably. Leaves from plants supplied with low soil oxygen levels contained significantly less protein amino acids: lysine, histidine, aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, glycine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine but more arginine than analogous leaves of plants supplied with normal soil oxygen concn.

The leaves of Phytophthora-infested plants contained significantly lower concn of nonprotein amino acids: threonine, glycine, alanine, cystine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine but higher concn of arginine and aspartic and glutamic acids. The nonprotein amino acids: lysine, arginine, aspartic acid, and pro line were higher, while threonine and glutamic acid were lower, in seedling leaves supplied with low soil oxygen than those in leaves on plants supplied with normal soil oxygen.

The protein and nonprotein proline, and the sum of nonprotein amino acids increased in leaves of noninfested plants, while decreasing in leaves of infested plants, with a decreasing level of soil oxygen to roots.

Substantive amounts of protein amino acids found in citrus seedling leaves were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, leucine, and arginine; those of nonprotein amino acids were proline, arginine, serine, lysine, and aspartic acid. These amounts represent, respectively, 50 and 90% of the sum.

Open Access

Abstract

The vol of gas spaces per unit root vol (porosity) was measured for 4 citrus rootstock cultivars grown in sand culture for 100 days under greenhouse conditions. Rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) had a porosity of 7.2% which was significantly less than sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) at 10.9% and ‘Troyer’ citrange (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. × C. sinensis) at 9.4%. Trifoliate orange (P. trifoliata) had a mean porosity of 9.8% with more variability than the other cultivars. ‘Troyer’ citrange roots sampled from trees grown in solution culture had a porosity of 13.2% and this is significantly higher than for roots grown in sand culture. Characterization of root porosity is one important factor in assessing the significance of internal plant aeration.

Open Access

Abstract

The effects of 2 rootstocks of avocado (Persea americana Mill.), 2 soil oxygen levels, and 2 soil moisture levels on nutrient uptake and translocation showed that seedling Duke and Topa Topa rootstocks produced little change in the growth of ‘Hass’ scion, nutrient concentrations in the leaves, stems, and roots or the total amount of nutrients absorbed per plant. Total amounts of 11 nutrients studied were significantly lower, irrespective of concentrations found in the various plant tissues, in plants grown in with 2% soil oxygen than in plants supplied with 21% soil oxygen. Low soil moisture reduced dry weights of leaves and stems, and total dry weight of plants. Total amounts of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, and Mn per plant, irrespective of nutrient concentrations in the leaves, stems, and roots, were significantly lower in plants grown under low soil moisture.

Open Access