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  • Author or Editor: L. George Wilson x
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Abstract

People familiar with the tropics are aware of the wide variety of fruits grown in these regions. Some tropical fruits such as bananas, pineapples and papayas are available in temperate zone markets. However, such exotic tropical fruits as mangosteen, carambola, and star apple are rarely, if ever, seen in markets outside the tropics. Other fruits such as citrus, avocados and mangos, which are adaptable to the tropics as well as the sub-tropics, are commonly consumed in the temperate zone. Then there are those temperate fruits such as strawberries, pome fruits and cantelopes that may be adapted to production in certain areas of the tropics. Since bananas are the major tropical fruit exported to temperate zone markets, the handling practices involved with this crop will be described. Considerations for handling other major and minor tropical fruits will be discussed also.

Open Access

The role of university international programs offices in facilitating involvement of horticulturists in international and national consulting opportunities will be discussed. Horticulturists and other faculty are frequently included in the implementation of contracts and subcontracts managed by universities, university consortia and public and private sector agencies. International programs offices serve as brokers by maintaining contact with faculty interested in consulting assignments and with a diversity of organizations who require consulting expertise. Experience is important to those seeking consultants' services. Therefore, it is recommended that those faculty wishing to get established in international and national consulting activities remain flexible and perhaps initially accept broader based assignments. Faculty should determine in advance the position of their university administration regarding consulting.

Free access

Abstract

Flooding is a serious problem in sweet potato production in Atlantic and Gulf Coast states. Studies have been attempted using irrigation to simulate flooding (1, 3). Results have been inconsistent and flood damage was often difficult to induce. However, during 5 days in 1984, Hurricane Diana resulted in 267.5 mm of rainfall on sweet potato cultivar plots at the Horticultural Crops Research Station in Clinton, N.C. The plots were planted in a Norfolk sandy loam soil. When plots were harvested 2 weeks later, flood damage was readily apparent. Typical symptoms of flooding injury included visible soft, rotted areas, growth of saprophytic fungi on the surface and a noticeable odor of fermentation. Roots were separated into three groups (total marketable, culls, and flood-damaged roots) and weighed. Samples were also taken of apparently sound roots for intercellular space and dry matter evaluations (four roots each) and for determining amount of sub-sequent rotting during curing and storing (12–13 kg). Intercellular space and percent dry matter were determined according to Kushman and Pope (2).

Open Access

All available cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cultigens were tested for combining ability for fruit storage ability by crossing them with the gynoecious inbred Gy 14. Fruit weight and firmness were measured before and after storage, and fruits were rated for water loss after storage. The cultigens with the lowest percentage of fruit weight loss during storage were PI 172839, PI 344067, PI 264667, PI 171612, PI 339245, PI 220171, PI 279469, and PI 368550; those with the lowest percentage of loss in fruit firmness were PI 379284, PI 339241, PI 414159, PI 422177, `Regal', PI 109483, `Addis', PI 285603, PI 257486, and `Calypso'. The cultigens demonstrating the least fruit shriveling were `Dasher II', `Sprint 440', `Texas Long', PI 390255, PI 432870, `Pacer', PI 419078, PI 390247, PI 321011, and PI 414158. The 10 best cultigens from the initial screening study, along with the four worst cultigens and six checks, were retested directly (not as F1 progeny) for fruit keeping ability in two storage conditions and at two harvest dates. No significant differences were detected between the two harvest dates and storage conditions.

Free access

Conservation tillage using residue from a cover crop grown before potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production has been infrequently and inconclusively studied. The objectives of this study were to 1) conduct a field study to evaluate soil physical properties, and potato growth and yield, in conventional-tillage (CT), no-tillage (NT), and subsurface-tillage (SST) systems and 2) conduct a greenhouse study to evaluate the effect of soil bulk density (ρb) on potato growth and yield. Potatoes (`Atlantic') were planted into residue of sorghum-sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench × S. sudanense (Piper) Staph] at two sites in eastern North Carolina—Plymouth into Portsmouth fine sandy loam and Lewiston into Norfolk sandy loam. Potatoes in the NT and SST system emerged more slowly than potatoesplanted conventionally. There were no differences in plant population or size by 8 weeks after planting at Plymouth, but plant population and size were less in NT and SST systems at Lewiston. Reducing tillage also affected soil compaction, increased soil moisture early in the season at both sites, and increased ρb at Lewiston. Yield of U.S. No. 1 potatoes planted in NT and SST systems were comparable to potatoes planted in a CT system at Plymouth, but were less than potatoes planted in a CT system at Lewiston. There were no differences in yield between potatoes planted with NT and SST. In the greenhouse study, ρb did not affect leaf area or tuber yield or tuber grade. Specific sites and soils may allow for comparable potato production with no or SST, but further research, conducted on different soil types would promote further understanding of the impacts of reducing tillage in potato production.

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