Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author or Editor: L. F. Hough x
Clear All Modify Search
Authors: and

Abstract

In Brazil, apple culture is concentrated at high elevations in the southern states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná, and São Paulo. In 1986, there were 28,000 ha of apples. However, most plantings are quite new. For instance, in the state of Santa Catarina, which has 60% of the total production, there are now more than 13,000 ha of apples, compared to only 265 ha in 1970.

Open Access

Abstract

The principal area of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) production in Brazil is in the south in the states of Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul, and Paraná. In these states, apples are grown using modern technology, and trees are propagated on size-controlling rootstocks (1). Apple production areas are limited because present cultivars have inadequate climatic adaptation and a high level of susceptibility to fungal diseases, including apple scab [Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint.], powdery mildew [Podosphaera leucotricha (Ell. & Ev.) Salm.], and bitter rot [Glomerella cingulata (Ston.) Spauld & Schrenk] (2). There is a need to develop early ripening cultivars that would make it possible to reduce the cost of chemical protection against diseases and also reduce the length of time that late-maturing apples must be stored until the beginning of the next summer's harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

Production of early ripening apples is becoming important in many areas at intermediate altitudes in southern Brazil, which have a subtropical climate with mild winters (1). However in these areas, winter temperatures only allow cultivation of apple cultivars that require ≈400 hr of chilling at <7.2°C. The cultivars Anna, Ein Shemer, and Vered from Israel, and several local cultivars, such as Rainha, Ohio Beauty, Bruckner do Brasil, and Culinaria, have satisfactory adaptation and are reasonably productive in these areas. With few exceptions, however, the fruit quality is unsatisfactory for Brazilian tastes.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Jerseyglo’ is a large, firm yellow-fleshed freestone peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] for the fresh market. The fruit ripens with ‘Jerseyqueen’, ‘Redskin’, and ‘Elberta’. It was named and released in 1979 in order to provide a large, attractive, firm-fleshed peach in this season with moderate levels of flower bud hardiness and resistance to bacterial spot [Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni (Smith) Young et at.]. ‘Jerseyglo’ is recommended as a replacement for ‘Jerseyqueen’.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Summerglo’ is a large, yellow-fleshed freestone peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] for the fresh market. The fruit ripens approximately one week after ‘Redhaven’. It was named and released in 1978 to meet the need for a large peach in this season. ‘Summerglo’ leaves and fruit are susceptible to bacterial spot [Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni (Smith) Young et al.]. Flower bud hardiness is similar to or slightly better than ‘Loring’.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Redfree’ is an attractive high finish red apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) with field immunity to the apple scab organism (Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint). The fruit is medium size. It matures 2 to 3 weeks before ‘Prima’ and 1 week before ‘Paulared’. ‘Redfree’ is released as a potential commercial cultivar for use as a summer dessert apple.

Open Access

Abstract

Selections of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) of known parentage were exposed in a greenhouse to artificial infestations of European red mite. The clones PRI 95356, N.J. 70, PRI 123056, and PRI 159155 and ‘Vista Bella9, were the least preferred (P = 5%); mite counts per leaf and per cm2 of leaf area were highly correlated even though the leaf area varied within and between selections. There was no evidence that any parent in the pedigrees contributed to ERM resistance based on an analysis of the association of mite numbers for the 4th and 5th week after infestation and the expected frequency of genetic contribution from various parents in the pedigree.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Jonafree’ is an attractive red apple (Malm domestia Borkh) with field immunity to apple scab incited by Venturia inaequalis (Cke) Wint. The fruit is of medium size and matures with ‘Jonathan’. It is released as a potential commercial cultivar with strong resemblance to ‘Jonathan’ in many major horticultural characters in addition to its similar maturity date.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Sir Prize’ is a yellow, russet-free apple with immunity to apple scab caused by Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint. The fruit is large and ripens along with ‘Golden Delicious’. It is released as a home garden cultivar.

Open Access

Abstract

Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint. is one of the most economically important apple diseases, because of the annual loss of marketable fruit, tree debilitation as a result of foliage destruction, and the cost of chemicals, equipment, and labor for its control. Infection can occur at any time during the growing season in humid apple-producing areas of the world. Most scab control programs must be based on the application of 5 to 15 or more protective fungicide sprays from the beginning of bud break to harvest. Estimates of direct costs for scab control including fungicides, equipment costs, and labor range from 20 to 30¢ per bushel or some 10% of the annual cost of production. In addition, chemical control must be exacting with application of spray materials most efficacious in rainy spring weather it is oftne difficult to move equipment through the orchard.

Open Access