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Neil L. Heckman, Garald L. Horst, Roch E. Gaussoin, and Kevin W. Frank

Internal heating during sod storage can lead to plant deterioration and is a limiting factor in sod transportation. Storage practices such as the use of refrigeration and vacuum packaging have increased storage time; however, these are usually not practical or economical. Experiments were conducted to develop a feasible growth regulator management technique, using trinexapac-ethyl, to increase the storage life of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) sod. Experimental setup for all experiments was a completely randomized design with a 2 (trinexapac-ethyl vs. control) × 3 (storage times) factorial treatment arrangement with 3 replications. Trinexapac-ethyl was applied at 0.23 kg·ha-1 to Kentucky bluegrass 2 weeks prior to harvesting. Results showed that sod treated with trinexapac-ethyl was as much as 10 °C cooler than the controls in the center of the sod stacks after 48 hours of storage. The reduced sod temperatures led to a 30% greater tensile strength and 17% better quality ratings in treated sod after 24 hours of storage. A preharvest application of trinexapac-ethyl appears to increase storage times of Kentucky bluegrass sod, which may improve sod market quality. Chemical name used: [4(cyclopropyl-α-hydroxy-methylene)-3,5-dioxocyclohexanecarboxylic acid ethyl ester] (trinexapac-ethyl).

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Kevin W. Frank, Roch E. Gaussoin, Jack D. Fry, Michael D. Frost, and James H. Baird

Field studies were conducted in Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma in 1996 to evaluate the influence of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) applied alone or in combination on the establishment rate of buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] from seed. `Cody' buffalograss burrs were planted at 98 kg·ha-1. Nitrogen was applied at 0 or 49 kg·ha-1 at planting and at 49 kg·ha-1 weekly or every other week for 5 weeks after seeding (WAS). The total N amounts applied were 0, 49, 147, or 294 kg·ha-1. Phosphorus and K were applied at rates of 0 or 49 kg·ha-1 at planting only. Percent buffalograss coverage ratings were taken weekly for up to 11 WAS. Buffalograss coverage was enhanced by N rates up to 147 kg·ha-1. Application of P improved buffalograss establishment at the Nebraska and Oklahoma sites but had no effect at the Kansas site. Potassium application had no influence on establishment at any site. Chemical names used: methyl 2-[[[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-amino]carbonyl]amino] sulfonyl]benzoate (metsulfuron methyl); 6-chloro-N,-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (simazine)