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  • Author or Editor: Kevin E. McPhee x
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Plant breeders must be aware of sources of resistance to pathogens that affect their crops. Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schl. f. sp. pisi Snyd. & Hans. is a fungal disease that affects peas and is important worldwide. Resistance to the different races of the pathogen has been identified in adapted germplasm and from specific accessions in the United States World Collection of peas (Pisum sativum L.). The goal of this study was to evaluate the resistance to fusarium wilt race 2 in the Pisum core collection. Of the 452 accessions screened, 62 (14%) were resistant. The resistant accessions included accessions from P.s. ssp. elatius that were collected from 24 different countries. The wide distribution of resistance around the world precludes the identification of any single country or region as a source of resistance. Of the 62 accessions resistant to race 2, 39 are also resistant to race 1 based on data obtained from GRIN. One of the wild progenitors, PI 344012, possessed resistance to races 1 and 2.

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Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a nutritionally complete food, but contains antinutritional compounds that reduce digestibility. One group of compounds includes the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) (raffinose, stachyose, and verbascose), which are partly responsible for flatulence after beans are eaten. RFOs stabilize cell membranes during seed desiccation and when the seed rehydrates during germination. While low levels of RFOs are desirable nutritionally, high levels may enhance germination and emergence, particularly in cold, wet soils. Eight landraces selected for high and low sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose content, were crossed in a diallel mating design to investigate genetic control of the RFOs. Derivatized soluble sugars were measured using gas-liquid chromatography. Fructose, sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose were detected. In the F1, fructose varied from 0.1 to 2.5 mg·g-1 dry weight (DW), sucrose from 17.2 to 56.5 mg·g-1 DW, raffinose from 0.1 to 4.1 mg·g-1 DW, and stachyose ranged from 7.6 to 43.7 mg·g-1 DW. Griffing's analysis estimates of general combining ability were on average, 16.5 times larger than specific combining ability for all the RFOs, indicating that additive genetic variance was most important. Significant reciprocal differences were detected in the F1 and F2, but not in the F3. RFO accumulation was partially dominant as indicated by Hayman's analysis. Narrow sense heritability averaged over F2 and F3 generations for sucrose, raffinose, stachyose, total sugar, and total oligosaccharides were 0.22, 0.54, 0.44, 0.17, and 0.27, respectively. Moderate heritabilities indicate that manipulation of RFO accumulation in this set of bean lines would probably need to be done on a progeny row basis with replication.

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Dry pea (Pisum sativum L.) production in many areas of the world may be severely diminished by soil inhabiting pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi race 1, the causal organism of fusarium wilt race 1. Our objective was to identify closely linked marker(s) to the fusarium wilt race 1 resistance gene (Fw) that could be used for marker assisted selection in applied pea breeding programs. Eighty recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from the cross of Green Arrow (resistant) and PI 179449 (susceptible) were developed through single-seed descent, and screened for disease reaction in race 1 infested field soil and the greenhouse using single-isolate inoculum. The RILs segregated 38 resistant and 42 susceptible fitting the expected 1:1 segregation ratio for a single dominant gene (χ2 = 0.200). Bulk segregant analysis (BSA) was used to screen 64 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primer pairs and previously mapped random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers to identify candidate markers. Eight AFLP primer pairs and 15 RAPD primers were used to screen the RIL mapping population and generate a linkage map. One AFLP marker, ACG:CAT_222, was within 1.4 cM of the Fw gene. Two other markers, AFLP marker ACC:CTG_159 at 2.6 cM linked to the susceptible allele, and RAPD marker Y15_1050 at 4.6 cM linked to the resistant allele, were also identified. The probability of correctly identifying resistant lines to fusarium wilt race 1, with DNA marker ACG:CAT_222, is 96% percent. These markers will be useful for marker assisted breeding in applied pea breeding programs.

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