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Brian A. Kahn, John P. Damicone, Kenneth E. Jackson, James E. Motes and Mark E. Payton

Nine nematicide treatments were evaluated from 1993 through 1995 in field experiments on paprika pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Materials tested included a chitinurea soil amendment and six chemicals: fosthiazate, carbofuran, aldicarb, oxamyl, fenamiphos, and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D). Stands at harvest were increased relative to the control by chitin-urea, fosthiazate, and 1,3-D, but only fosthiazate increased marketable fruit yield relative to the control. Aldicarb reduced preharvest nematode populations relative to the control, but aldicarb did not result in a significant fruit yield increase. Chitin-urea was the only treatment to produce a net increase in nematode counts from preplant to preharvest in all three years. Although fosthiazate was promising, nematicide treatments were of limited benefit under the conditions of these studies. Chemical names used: (RS)-S-sec-butyl O-ethyl 2-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-ylphosphonothioate (fosthiazate); 2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate (carbofuran); 2-methyl-2-(methylthio)propionaldehyde O-(methylcarbamoyl)oxime (aldicarb); methyl N′N′ -dimethyl-N-[(methylcarbamoyl)oxy]-1-thiooxamimidate (oxamyl); ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylthio)phenyl(1-methylethyl) phosphoramidate (fenamiphos).

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Brian A. Kahn, John P. Damicone, Kenneth E. Jackson, James E. Motes and Mark E. Payton

Nematodes (Meloidogyne sp.) are a potential problem when paprika peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) are grown in fields historically planted to peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.). Nine nematicide treatments were evaluated over 3 years in field experiments on paprika pepper. Materials tested included the chitin nematicide ClandoSan and six chemicals: fosthiazate, carbofuran, aldicarb, oxamyl, fenamiphos, and dichloropropene. Stands at harvest were increased relative to the control by ClandoSan in 2 of 3 years. Other horticultural effects (plant dry mass and fruit yield) were minimal for all nine nematicide treatments. No one nematicide treatment consistently reduced nematode counts at harvest relative to the control. Nematode counts at harvest were greater in plots treated with ClandoSan than in plots treated with any other material in 2 of 3 years. Nematicide treatments were not cost effective under the conditions of these studies.