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  • Author or Editor: Kenneth C. Sanderson x
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Abstract

Of several materials tested on foisythia, α-cycloprophyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyl> 5-pyrimidin erne than ol (ancymidol) proved to be the safest and most effective height control treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

The disposal of solid wastes from domestic and industrial sources and sludges from sewage treatment plants is an ever-increasing problem. More than 20 years ago our society’s prodigious waste production prompted Vance Packard (65) to characterize our society as a society of “waste makers” going from “riches to rags.” Estimates of the per capita production of waste vary, but it has been noted that the average person is generating more waste each year (97). During the last decade, environmental concerns and energy needs have raised serious questions about our methods of waste disposal. Bohn and Cauthorn (13) have observed that our handling of waste has been unimaginative and expensive.

Open Access

Abstract

Cool, clear water! More than two-thirds of Earth is covered with water, snowfields, glaciers, and ice caps. Water is so common that it has been treated with neglect, if not contempt.

Open Access

`Annette Hegg Brilliant Diamond' poinsettias were directly rooted and grown in 1 sphagnum peat moss:l perlite medium treated with six treatments of Mo and a check. The treatments were: 1) 0.2 ppm Mo liquid weekly, 2) 3.0 mg Mo plaster-of-Paris tablet, 3) 0.6g per liter liquid STEM once, 4) 0.6 kg per m3 Micromax incorporated (Preplant), 5) 3.3 kg per m3 Perk incorporated, 6) 3.0 kg per m3 Esmigran incorporated, 7) 1.2 kg per m3 FTE 503, and 8) check (untreated). Plant height and foliar Mo, N, and Mn were affected by Mo treatments. Untreated plants were shorter than plants receiving Mo treatments. Weekly liquid Mo treatments (10.0 ppm) yielded plants with the highest foliar Mo content and differed from all other treatments. FTE 503 plants (4.2 ppm Mo) differ from other Mo treatments and check plants (1.4 ppm Mo). Liquid Mo plants (6.1% N) had the highest N content and differed from all treatments except Perk (5.8% N) and Micromax (5.8% N) and Micromax (5.8% N). plants. Perk-treated plants (155 ppm Mn) contained more Mn than other plants, whereas check plants (48.4 ppm Mn) and Mo tablet plants (38.4 ppm Mn) contained the least Mn content. Bract number, plant spread and Fe content were unaffected by Mo treatments.

Free access

`Annette Hegg Brilliant Diamond' poinsettias were directly rooted and grown in 1 sphagnum peat moss:l perlite medium treated with six treatments of Mo and a check. The treatments were: 1) 0.2 ppm Mo liquid weekly, 2) 3.0 mg Mo plaster-of-Paris tablet, 3) 0.6g per liter liquid STEM once, 4) 0.6 kg per m3 Micromax incorporated (Preplant), 5) 3.3 kg per m3 Perk incorporated, 6) 3.0 kg per m3 Esmigran incorporated, 7) 1.2 kg per m3 FTE 503, and 8) check (untreated). Plant height and foliar Mo, N, and Mn were affected by Mo treatments. Untreated plants were shorter than plants receiving Mo treatments. Weekly liquid Mo treatments (10.0 ppm) yielded plants with the highest foliar Mo content and differed from all other treatments. FTE 503 plants (4.2 ppm Mo) differ from other Mo treatments and check plants (1.4 ppm Mo). Liquid Mo plants (6.1% N) had the highest N content and differed from all treatments except Perk (5.8% N) and Micromax (5.8% N) and Micromax (5.8% N). plants. Perk-treated plants (155 ppm Mn) contained more Mn than other plants, whereas check plants (48.4 ppm Mn) and Mo tablet plants (38.4 ppm Mn) contained the least Mn content. Bract number, plant spread and Fe content were unaffected by Mo treatments.

Free access

Abstract

The importance of monitoring air pollutants has been dramatically emphasized by the occurrence of killer smogs in major cities throughout the world. However, many other valid reasons exist for monitoring air pollutants. Nearly 40 years ago the United States and Canada were entangled in an air pollution controversy which emphasized that air pollutants ignore national boundaries. There is nothing to stop the estimated 264 million tons of air pollutants discharged annually in the United States from wandering over neighboring borders. Such a trip is even facilitated by the fact that almost 90% of this air pollution is invisible. As horticulturists, we are most concerned about air pollution effects on plants. Crop losses in the United States due to air pollution amount to approximately 500 million dollars annually. Some of this damage may come from pollutants generated outside the United States. However, air pollutants generated in the United States have been responsible on several occasions for crop damage in Canada. Scandinavian and other countries sharing common borders often share their air pollutants just as North Americans do. Fifteen years ago a World Health Organization publication indicated that sampling, analysis, and instrumentation in the field of air pollution monitoring was in a state of chaos. This symposium will show that out of the chaos has come order and that the science of monitoring air pollutants has become quite sophisticated and most complex, though many problems still remain to be solved. As an example, during the past year a disagreement on how to measure air pollution in California was reported on prime time television in the United States. Problems such as this are discouraging and most unfortunate. Nonetheless, they illustrate the heart of the air pollutant monitoring problem, which is that man has become biologically obsolete in sensing pollution hazards and we must develop new and more accurate methods and sensitive instruments to detect these hazards for ourselves, our animals, and our plants if life is to survive.

Open Access

Abstract

Energy is like the air that we breathe, something that we have taken for granted for far too long. Almost every decade we have seen increased, almost insatiable, demands for more energy with little concern for supply or price. In the past decade, a grave threat to our national security as a result of our extensive dependence on unstable foreign oil supplies and escalating energy costs sobered up our energy thinking.

Open Access

Abstract

H.B. Tukey, Jr.’s request for a better word than “ornamentals” (HortScience 22:9, Feb. 1987) is a point well taken: however, “urban plants” may or may not be an acceptable replacement. It is true that “ornamentals” does us a great disservice. Whether “urban plants” with a professional connotation would be any better would depend on its acceptance in the mind and market. A correct term is needed to qualify the essential and beneficial effects of ornamental horticulture on human beings. It must have both psychological and economic meanings.

Open Access

Cuttings (3 per 1.5-liter pot) of `Annette Hegg Lady' and `V-14 Glory' poinsettias were directly rooted under mist and subsequently grown for treatment with various growth regulator sprays. Sprays of 40 ppm and 61 ppm paclobutrazol, 2,500 ppm daminozide plus 1,500 chlormequat, 20 ppm and 40 ppm ethephon, 150 ppm ancymidol, 5,000 ppm daminozide, 20 ppm and 40 ppm uniconazole, and 25 ppm and 50 ppm flurprimidol were applied to the plants with a low pressure, high volume sprayer on October 23. Sprays of 40 ppm uniconezole caused the most height retardation with both cultivers, however 4000 ppm ethephon, 20 ppm uniconazole and 61 ppm paclobutrazol often gave comparable height retardation. Bract area of both cultivars was most severely retarded by 40 ppm uniconazole and 4,000 ppm ethephon.

Free access

Abstract

African violets (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl.) are propagated commercially by leaf cuttings with or without a petiole (3). Laurie and Kiplinger (4) reported that leaves propagated without petioles produce more crowns. Developing shoots or crowns (plantlets) with roots usually are divided and handled as young plants. In one variation of this method the roots are removed from the shoots, the shoots are graded and the graded shoots are rerooted to obtain uniform plants. This method requires numerous shoots.

Open Access