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Kenji Sakurai, Susan K. Brown, and Norman Weeden

The S-alleles of 55 apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) cultivars and selections were determined using an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification system for 11 different S-alleles (S2, S3, S4, S5, S7, S9, S24, S26, S27, Sd, Sf). Four cultivars had S-alleles different than those predicted by their parentage. Three commercial cultivars of unknown pedigrees had S-genotypes that suggested `Delicious' and `Golden Delicious' were the parents. S-genotyping results supported controlled pollination test results. The genotypes of the five triploid cultivars examined were consistent with the unreduced gamete being contributed by the female parent. Although a large number of S-genotypes is available in apple, artificial selection or repeated use of the same cultivars as parents appears to have significantly restricted the number of compatibility groups associated with commercial clones. In controlled reciprocal crosses between two cultivars of known S-genotypes, the segregation of S-genotypes and S-alleles was 1:1:1:1, the ratio expected for random pairing of alleles.

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Kenji Sakurai, Susan K. Brown, and Norman F. Weeden

The S alleles of 15 Japanese apple cultivars were determined by using the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification and restriction enzyme digestion system developed by Janssens et al. (1995). Both S alleles were identified in eight diploid cultivars, two S alleles in three triploid cultivars, and one S allele in the remaining four diploid cultivars. Two cultivars had S alleles different than those predicted by their parentage, and in one comparison of a cultivar with its sport, an identity problem was discovered. The technique helped to indicate the parent contributing the unreduced gamete in triploids.

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Yuko Yoshizawa, Kenji Sakurai, Satoru Kawaii, Masayoshi Asari, Junichi Soejima, and Noboru Murofushi

Aqueous ethanol extracts prepared from 19 apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) cultivars were studied to explore their antiproliferative activity. Half of them showed strong inhibition on proliferation of human leukemic HL-60 cells, while the others were weak. Total polyphenols, 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, and total anthocyanins were measured and the results indicated that the antiproliferative activity was more strongly correlated to the polyphenols and radical scavenging activity than to the anthocyanin content. Several polyphenols in `Jonathan' were identified and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Among those compounds found during HPLC, catechin and epicatechin seemed partially responsible for HL-60 antiproliferation. A careful examination on parentage of the apple cultivars tested revealed that `Jonathan' and its progeny showed high antiproliferation toward HL-60. This is the first observation about the relationship between antiproliferative activity and parentage of apples, and the information would be useful to create new apple cultivars that posses more anticancer potential.